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I started a quest to find terrific blues music and incredible musicianship when I was just a little kid. I also have a tremendous appreciation of fine musical instruments and equipment. One of my greatest joys all of my life was sharing my finds with my friends. I'm now publishing my journey. I hope that you come along!


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Showing posts with label Pinetop Perkins. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Pinetop Perkins. Show all posts

Tuesday, January 5, 2016

ELROB Records artists: Pinetop Perkins & Jimmy Rogers with Little Mike and the Tornadoes - Genuine Blues Legends - New Release Review

I just received the newest release, Genuine Blues Legends from Little Mike (Markowitz) and the Tornadoes featuring Pinetop Perkins and Jimmy Rogers and it's terrific! Recorded live at the Grand Auditorium in Ellsworth Maine on May 21, 1988, this is a real gem! Opening with Cleanhead Vinson's Kidney Stew, Pinetop is rocking the keys and lead vocals and Little Mike is on harp backed by Tony O Melio on guitar, Brad Vickers on bass and Michael Anderson on drums. A cool shuffle track, Mike really takes the harp for a ride and Pinetop is in his prime. Excellent opener! Tommy Tucker's High Heeled Sneakers is up and Chicago style. Melio rips off some real nice blues riffs on guitar on this track and in addition to solid work by Pinetop on vocal and piano, Little Mike rides high on harp. Very nice! St Louis Jimmy Odem's Had My Fun is up next cranking in at over 10 minutes and Pinetop's vocals and piano work on this track are terrific. Melio digs deep on this track putting together some really tight guitar phrases. There is not a wasted not on this track. Excellent! Joe Willie Perkin's track, For You My Love is a real blues shuffle with Pinetop literally taking control. If you aren't familiar with Pinetop's work from this time period, you owe it to yourself to hear this release. This is Pinetop at his best! Little Mike really cranks it up on this track pushed along nicely by Anderson. Jimmy Rogers joins on this track and lays down some cool riffs of his own. Excellent! On Jimmy Reed's Big Boss Man, Reed takes the mic backed by Pinetop and the Tornadoes. Little Mike keeps his riffs tame giving plenty of room for Pinetop to solo. Very nice. Another Rogers original, All In My Sleep slows things down a bit and Melio and Mike take an early instrumental intro reminding me quite a bit of Bloomfield/Butterfield. Roger's vocals are more pronounced on this track and Pinetop really digs in on piano. Melio takes a later solo again putting me in mind of Bloomfield. At 9 minutes plus this track is very nice! Shuffle track, The Last Time, again led by Rogers captures the classic Rogers style. The blend and clarity of soloing on this release by Perkins and Little Mike is terrific. On Perkins penned, When I Lost My Baby, similar to a Ivory Joe Hunter song of similar name, features Pinetop back on lead vocal and piano. Pinetop's keyboad work is sensational and tight and Little Mike's harp work stimulating. Very cool! On Pinetop's Boogie Woogie, Pinetop really lets it go with Melio, Mike and Rogers each adding nicely to what really is Pinetop's track. Excellent! Wrapping the release is Pine and Jimmy's Jump, a tight instrumental jam. Each man gets his chance up front and takes it deep. This is a great conclusion to what had to be a terrific show. Excellent!

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Unfortunately I couldnt find any footage of these guys together but Here's Little Mike!

Friday, April 5, 2013

Got My Mojo Working - Pinetop Perkins with Rick Harvey & The Texcellorators

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Monday, August 27, 2012

Direct Music Distribution artist:The Bluesmasters - The Bluesmasters Volume Two - New Release Review


In dedication to Pinetop Perkins and Hubert Sumlin, both who played on this recording, a second volume of The Bluesmasters has been released. Featured are Mickey Thomas (vocals), Cassie Taylor (vocal and bass), hazel Miller (vocal),Eric Gakes (guitar) Rusty Anderson (guitar), Tim Tucker (guitar), Doug Lynn (harmonica), Aynsley Dunbar (drums), Larry Thompson (drums)and Ric Ulsky (Hammond B-3). First up is Sam Cooke's Bring It On Home To Me done jumps style with Taylor on vocals and Tucker kicking out a hot riff on guitar. Elmore James tune Talk To Me Baby gone swing shuffle again finds Taylor and Tucker rocking the joint with a cool harp riff from Lynn pushing Tucker on guitar. Johnnie Johnson standard Tanqueray gets a shuffle feel and Miller leads the way for a totally different feel altogether. Willie Dixon's I Just Want To Make Love To You gets a slinky feel. Don Nix ballad Same Old Blues features Taylor at her best and Tucker lays down a real strong guitar solo. I'd Rather Drink Muddy Water, made popular by Ella, features Thomas and Taylor trading lead vocals and Lynn on harp. Big Boss Man features Miller again on vocals stomping out the blues. Fine Cadillac done shuffle style features Gales on vocal and extensive guitar with Taylor and may be the best track on the recording. Thomas is back on Willie Dixon's Red Rooster and he sounds as good as ever. I particularly like the harp work by Lynn on this track. Robert Johnson's 3220 Blues is well managed by Taylor and group. Get Me A Car highlights Perkins on piano with Thomas on vocals alternating back and forth between the latin and shuffle rhythms. Jimmy Reed's Honest I Do again featuring Perkins and Taylor is done New Orleans style with some tasty guitar riffs added over top of the solid piano leading the way.

If you want some solid blues with traditional flavoring, this may be your ticket.

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Wednesday, April 11, 2012

New Pinetop Perkins & Karp/Foley titles from Blind Pig!

blindpigrecords.com
NEW RELEASES FROM BLIND PIG RECORDS!
Noted roots music label Blind Pig Records will release new titles on April 17th by beloved blues piano icon Pinetop Perkins and the dynamic performing and songwriting duo of Peter Karp and Sue Foley.
PINETOP PERKINS "HEAVEN" (AVAILABLE ON CD and LP)

If there is a heaven - and God knows there ought to be for those blues musicians of The Delta who endured grievous deprivation and suffered countless indignities yet brought joy to so many - Pinetop Perkins is certainly there. It is unquestionably a little slice of heaven for us to hear Pinetop once again on this previously unreleased after-hours set of masterful music.

http://mailman.305spin.com/users/blindpigrecords/images/Pinetop5145e.jpg

The beloved dean of blues piano players and three time Grammy winner passed away last year, just four months shy of his 98th birthday. Heaven captures a beautifully intimate 1986 studio performance by Pinetop when he was "only" seventy three, and still at the peak of his powers. He performs solo on all but four tracks.

The self-taught master pianist is in magnificent form, delivering thundering chords and glissandos, rolled chords, trilled notes, complex metrical substitutions, sly musical quotes - and of course his trademark lightly swinging boogie woogie. His strong, rough-edged voice conveys an authority that is complemented by a subtle playfulness and vulnerability. On this album, his vocals are supplemented by recently-recorded contributions from Willie Smith on "Sitting On Top of the World" (believed to be Smith's last recording, as he passed away in September 2011) and Otis Clay, who captures the sweet agony of "Since I Fell For You."

Blind Pig is also issuing Pinetop's album on a limited edition 180 gram audiophile LP, the first title the label's simultaneously released on CD and LP since 1990. And in Pine's memory, we also urge support of the Pinetop Perkins Foundation (www.pinetopfoundation.org).

PETER KARP & SUE FOLEY "BEYOND THE CROSSROADS"
http://mailman.305spin.com/users/blindpigrecords/images/KarpFoley5146e.jpg

Beyond the Crossroads marks the newest chapter in the collaboration between these two noted singer-songwriter guitarists. A high voltage, plank spankin', piano boogyin', slide guitar stompin', blues-rocking CD that showcases twelve brilliantly crafted and unique original compositions. It's a loud celebration of triumph over tragedy, optimism over despair and faith over hopelessness

It delivers on the promise of Karp and Foley's groundbreaking, critically acclaimed 2010 song-cycle, He Said She Said. That album hit the Top 10 on the Billboard Blues Chart and was #1 for 6 weeks on the national blues and roots music radio charts. Says Foley, "Beyond the Crossroads is a natural extension of what we started with He Said She Said in that we're writing songs with themes in mind. Positivity, renewal, absolution." Karp added, "These times are trying - in the heart and in the streets. Time to fire up the amps and blow heat."



Tuesday, April 10, 2012

Blind Pig Records: Heaven - Pinetop Perkins- New Release Review


On April 17 Blind Pig Records will offer a previously unreleased set of 1986 "after hours" recordings by Pinetop Perkins called Heaven. Typically I think of posthumous recordings as a bunch of remastered junk that has been put together by a record company to squeeze ever last dime out of a deceased artist but this cd is terrific! The 12 track set finds Pinetop at top form performing solo on all but 4 tracks. It is a very intimate listen to Pinetop at his peak at only 73. Willie "Big Eyes" Smith contributes to Sitting On Top Of The World prior to his passing in September and Otis Clay compliments the jazz standard Since I Fell For You.
The cd (also available on 180g audiophile vinyl) opens with 44 Blues and it is solid as a rock. If this doesn't get your attention, you likely won't like the recordings. This is great! Perkins finger articulation on Relaxin' is right on. The feel is all there. I'm a sucker for Sittin' On Top Of The World and Perkins does a masterful job. Of course Pinetop's Boogie Woogie is present and jammin'. One of my favorite tracks is Ida B with Mike Markowitz on harp. Pinetop's Blues is strong and heartfelt demonstrating not only Perkins abilities on piano but also his effectiveness vocally. Pinetop's instumentl take on Willow Weep For Me converts it from an old Jazz vocal standard to a New Orleans blues track. That's All Right is a great summation for the recordings. Perkins sings with clarity and his playing is crisp and strong. This album is not only a must for those who have to have everything that Pinetop has ever done...but those who don't have any.

Great recordings and a great tribute to a great blues man!
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I looked had to try to find the right video but this is the best I could do. When these recordings were cut Pinetop was 73. In this recording he's 95, but most of the film that I could find of him that was time appropriate was featuring him with Muddy Waters.

Saturday, August 27, 2011

Pinetop Perkins Foundation keeps Pinetop's legacy alive!



Pinetop Perkins Foundation keeps Pinetop's legacy alive! The legendary Pinetop Perkins left us earlier this year after a long and musical life of 97 years. While alive he touched everyone who he came in contact with. His legacy continues with his namesake foundation. Formed in 2009, the Pinetop Perkins Foundation is a non-profit organization whose mission is to provide encouragement and support for young people at the beginning of their musical career; and help provide care and safety for elderly musicians at the twilight of their career. Fulfilling the first part of their mission, the Foundation offers an annual Youth Workshop Series to bring world-renowned blues artists for instruction and mentoring to young musicians. To find out about the 2012 workshop series and to find out more about the foundation's many activities check out the website at http://www.pinetopperkinsfoundation.org/. To see a photo page devoted to the great Pinetop Perkins, click on http://www.bobcorritore.com/photos62.html. Note that the annual Pinetop Homecoming at Hopson's Plantation in Claksdale, Mississippi will take place on Sunday October 9th, the day after the King Biscuit Blues Festival. This will be the first time that the event will be held posthumously, but Pinetop will surely be there in spirit.
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Thursday, July 7, 2011

Down In Mississippi - Pinetop Perkins


Joseph William Perkins (July 7, 1913 – March 21, 2011), known by the stage name Pinetop Perkins, was an American blues musician, specializing in piano music. He played with some of the most influential blues and rock and roll performers in American history, and received numerous honors during his lifetime including the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, and induction into the Blues Hall of Fame.
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Saturday, July 2, 2011

Casual Talk between Buddies - Little Smokey Smothers - Pinetop Perkins - Elvin Bishop


Joseph William Perkins (July 7, 1913 – March 21, 2011), known by the stage name Pinetop Perkins, was an American blues musician, specializing in piano music. He played with some of the most influential blues and rock and roll performers in American history, and received numerous honors during his lifetime including the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, and induction into the Blues Hall of Fame.



Little Smokey Smothers (January 2, 1939– November 20, 2010)Albert Abraham "Abe" Smothers was born in Tchula, Mississippi, learned guitar at the age of 15, and relocated to Chicago two years later. He soon appeared on stage playing alongside Arthur “Big Boy” Spires, Magic Sam, Otis Rush and Lazy Bill Lucas. In 1958 he joined up with Howlin' Wolf, and played on Wolf's recording session for Chess Records the following year. Tracks Smothers contributed to included "I've Been Abused," "Howlin' for My Darling," and "Mr. Airplane Man."


In 1961 he founded Little Smokey Smothers and the Pipeplayers. He later met Paul Butterfield and became a founding member of the Paul Butterfield Blues Band. He was replaced in the band by Elvin Bishop, but developed a friendship that lasted a lifetime. Throughout the 1960s Smothers appeared with Buddy Guy, James Cotton, Earl Hooker, and Junior Wells. Musical opportunities dried up in the 1970s, and Smothers worked in construction. He re-appeared in the 1980s with The Legendary Blues Band. Their 1989 recording, Woke up with the Blues, included contributions from Smothers.

In 1993, Bishop made a guest appearance on Smothers first solo album with the Dutch Black Magic label, Bossman! The Chicago Blues of Little Smokey Smothers. The recording also included work from Smothers' cousin, Lee "Shot" Williams. Bishop and Smothers played at the 1993 Chicago Blues Festival. Smothers had open heart surgery in 1995, but the following year issued Second Time Around. Smothers performed at the 1999 San Diego Blues Festival, and at a party for Mick Jagger's 55th birthday.


Alligator Records then issued That's My Partner (2000), a live album recorded in San Francisco, which saw Smothers reunited with Bishop.Smothers also appeared at the 2000 Chicago Blues Festival. In 2006 Smothers and Bishop played live at the Ground Zero club in Clarksdale, Mississippi. Latterly Smothers experienced health problems, and had both legs amputated due to diabetes.

In 2009, Bishop compiled the benefit album, Chicago Blues Buddies, incorporating recordings made by Smothers and Bishop dating back to 1992. Proceeds from the album helped to pay for Smothers' medical costs.


On November 20, 2010, after a spell in a Chicago hospital, Smothers died of natural causes.



Elvin Bishop (born October 21, 1942)
is an American blues and rock and roll musician and guitarist.
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Thursday, June 2, 2011

Delta Rising: A Blues Documentary -- Trailer

A film documentary about the blues. Clarksdale Mississippi to Memphis Tennessee. Although not new, a new one on the list for me to watch!

Features Morgan Freeman, Bill Luckett, Jimbo Mathus, Scott Bomar, James Montgomery, Chris Cotton, Ruby Wilson, Super Chikan, Grace Kelly, Pinetop Perkins, Honeyboy Edwards and others.





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Tuesday, May 31, 2011

Mr Lucky - Pinetop Perkins - Willie "Big Eyes" Smith


I believe that this song is actually called Merry Christmas Baby by John Lee Hooker.
Joseph William Perkins (July 7, 1913 – March 21, 2011), known by the stage name Pinetop Perkins, was an American blues musician, specializing in piano music. He played with some of the most influential blues and rock and roll performers in American history, and received numerous honors during his lifetime including the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, and induction into the Blues Hall of Fame.
Perkins was born in Belzoni, Mississippi, United States. He began his career as a guitarist, but then injured the tendons in his left arm in a fight with a choir girl in Helena, Arkansas. Unable to play guitar, Perkins switched to the piano, and also switched from Robert Nighthawk's KFFA radio program to Sonny Boy Williamson's King Biscuit Time. He continued working with Nighthawk, however, accompanying him on 1950's "Jackson Town Gal".

In the 1950s, Perkins joined Earl Hooker and began touring, stopping to record "Pinetop's Boogie Woogie" (written by Pinetop Smith) at Sam Phillips' studio in Memphis, Tennessee. ("They used to call me Pinetop," he recalled, "because I played that song.") However, Perkins was only 15 years old in 1928, when Smith originally recorded "Pinetop's Boogie Woogie".

Perkins then relocated to Illinois and left the music business until Hooker convinced him to record again in 1968. When Otis Spann left the Muddy Waters band in 1969, Perkins was chosen to replace him. He stayed for more than a decade, then left with several other musicians to form The Legendary Blues Band with Willie "Big Eyes" Smith, recording through the late 1970s, 1980s and early 1990s.

Perkins played a brief musical cameo on the street outside Aretha's Soul Food Cafe in the 1980 movie The Blues Brothers, having an argument with John Lee Hooker over who wrote "Boom Boom." He also appeared in the 1987 movie Angel Heart as a member of guitarist Toots Sweet's band.

Although he appeared as a sideman on countless recordings, Perkins never had an album devoted solely to his artistry, until the release of After Hours on Blind Pig Records in 1988. The tour in support of the album also featured Jimmy Rogers and Hubert Sumlin.

His robust piano is fairly presented in On Top (1992), an easy-going recital of blues standards with his old Waters' associate, Jerry Portnoy on harmonica. In 1998 Perkins released the album Legends featuring guitarist Hubert Sumlin.

Perkins was driving his automobile in 2004 in La Porte, Indiana, when he was hit by a train. The car was wrecked, but the 91-year-old driver was not seriously hurt. Until his death, Perkins lived in Austin, Texas. He usually performed a couple of nights a week at Nuno's on Sixth Street. In 2005, Perkins received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award.

In 2008, Perkins received a Grammy Award for Best Traditional Blues Album for Last of the Great Mississippi Delta Bluesmen: Live In Dallas together with Henry James Townsend, Robert Lockwood, Jr. and David Honeyboy Edwards. He was also nominated in the same category for his solo album, Pinetop Perkins on the 88's: Live in Chicago.

At the age of 97, he won a Grammy Award for Best Traditional Blues Album for Joined at the Hip, an album he recorded with Willie "Big Eyes" Smith. Perkins thus became the oldest-ever Grammy winner, edging out comedian George Burns who had won in the spoken word category 21 years earlier (he had tied with Burns, at the age of 90, in 2004). A little more than a month later, Perkins died on 21 March 2011 at his home in Austin, Texas. At the time of his death, the musician had more than 20 performances booked for 2011. Shortly before that, while discussing his late career resurgence with an interviewer, he conceded, "I can't play piano like I used to either. I used to have bass rolling like thunder. I can't do that no more. But I ask the Lord, please forgive me for the stuff I done trying to make a nickel." Along with David "Honeyboy" Edwards, he was one of the last two original Mississippi Delta blues musicians, and also to have a personal knowledge of, and friendship with, Robert Johnson
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Interview - Pinetop Perkins and Willie "Big Eyes" Smith

Joseph William Perkins (July 7, 1913 – March 21, 2011), known by the stage name Pinetop Perkins, was an American blues musician, specializing in piano music. He played with some of the most influential blues and rock and roll performers in American history, and received numerous honors during his lifetime including the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award, and induction into the Blues Hall of Fame.
Perkins was born in Belzoni, Mississippi. He began his career as a guitarist, but then injured the tendons in his left arm in a fight with a choirgirl in Helena, Arkansas. Unable to play guitar, Perkins switched to the piano, and also switched from Robert Nighthawk's KFFA radio program to Sonny Boy Williamson's King Biscuit Time. He continued working with Nighthawk, however, accompanying him on 1950's "Jackson Town Gal".



In the 1950s, Perkins joined Earl Hooker and began touring, stopping to record "Pinetop's Boogie Woogie" (written by Pinetop Smith) at Sam Phillips' studio in Memphis, Tennessee. ("They used to call me Pinetop," he recalled, "because I played that song.") However, Perkins was only 15 years old in 1928, when Smith originally recorded "Pinetop's Boogie Woogie".

Perkins then relocated to Illinois and left music until Hooker convinced him to record again in 1968.

When Otis Spann left the Muddy Waters band in 1969, Perkins was chosen to replace him. He stayed for more than a decade, then left with several other musicians to form The Legendary Blues Band with Willie "Big Eyes" Smith, recording through the late 1970s, 1980s and early 1990s.

Although he appeared as a sideman on countless recordings, Perkins never had an album devoted solely to his artistry, until the release of After Hours on Blind Pig Records in 1988. The tour in support of the album also featured Jimmy Rogers and Hubert Sumlin.

His robust piano is fairly presented in On Top (1992), an easy-going recital of blues standards with his old Waters' associate, Jerry Portnoy on harmonica. In 1998 Perkins released the album Legends featuring guitarist Hubert Sumlin.

Perkins was driving his automobile in 2004 in La Porte, Indiana, when he was hit by a train. The car was wrecked, but the 91-year-old driver was not seriously hurt. Until his death, Perkins lived in Austin, Texas. He usually performed a couple of nights a week at Nuno's on Sixth Street. In 2005, Perkins received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award.

In 2008, Perkins received a Grammy Award for Best Traditional Blues Album for Last of the Great Mississippi Delta Bluesmen: Live In Dallas together with Henry James Townsend, Robert Lockwood, Jr. and David Honeyboy Edwards. He was also nominated in the same category for his solo album, Pinetop Perkins on the 88's: Live in Chicago.

The song "Hey Mr. Pinetop Perkins", performed by Perkins and Angela Strehli, plays on the common misconception that Perkins wrote "Pinetop's Boogie Woogie":

Hey Mr. Pinetop Perkins
I got a question for you
How'd you write that first boogie woogie
The one they named after you

Perkins played a brief musical cameo on the street outside Aretha's Soul Food Cafe in the 1980 movie The Blues Brothers, having an argument with John Lee Hooker over who wrote "Boom Boom." He also appeared in the 1987 movie Angel Heart as a member of guitarist Toots Sweet's band.

At age 97, he won a Grammy Award for Best Traditional Blues Album for Joined at the Hip, an album he recorded with Willie "Big Eyes" Smith. Perkins thus became the oldest-ever Grammy winner, edging out comedian George Burns who had won in the spoken word category 21 years earlier (he had tied with Burns, at the age of 95, in 2004). A little more than a month later, Perkins died on 21 March 2011 at his home in Austin, Texas. At the time of his death, the musician had more than 20 performances booked for 2011. Shortly before that, while discussing his late career resurgence with an interviewer, he conceded, "I can't play piano like I used to either. I used to have bass rolling like thunder. I can't do that no more. But I ask the Lord, please forgive me for the stuff I done trying to make a nickel." Along with David "Honeyboy" Edwards, he was one of the last two original Mississippi Delta blues musicians, and also to have a personal knowledge of and friendship with Robert Johnson.


Willie "Big Eyes" Smith (born January 19, 1936, Helena, Arkansas) is a Grammy Award-winning American blues vocalist, harmonica player, and multi-award winning drummer. He is best known for several stints with the Muddy Waters band beginning in the early 1960s.Born in Arkansas in 1936, Smith learned to play harmonica at age seventeen just after moving to Chicago, Illinois. Smith's influences included listening to 78s and to KFFA King Biscuit radio shows, some of which were broadcast from Helena's Miller Theater, where he saw guitar player Joe Willie Wilkins, and harmonica player Sonny Boy Williamson II. On a Chicago visit in 1953 his mother took him to hear Muddy Waters at the Zanzibar club, where Henry Strong's harp playing inspired him to learn that instrument. In 1956, at the age of eighteen he formed a trio. He led the band on harp, Bobby Lee Burns played guitar, and Clifton James, who was the drummer. As "Little Willie" Smith he played in the Rocket Four, led by blues guitarist Arthur "Big Boy" Spires, and made recordings that were later reissued on the Delmark label. In 1955 Smith played harmonica on Bo Diddley's recording of the Willie Dixon song "Diddy Wah Diddy" for the Checker label.[citation needed] Drummers were in more demand than harp players, so Smith switched to drums and starting playing with Muddy Waters band. In 1959, Smith recorded with Waters on the 1960 album Muddy Waters Sings Big Bill Broonzy a tribute to Big Bill Broonzy

In 1961 Smith became a regular member of Muddy Water's band, which then consisted of George "Mojo" Buford, Luther Tucker, Pat Hare, and Otis Spann. By the mid '60s he'd left the band for more steady work as a cab driver. In the late '60s he rejoined Muddy's band and remained a permanent member until 1980. Smith appears on all of Muddy's Grammy Award winning albums, Hard Again, I'm Ready, They Call Me Muddy Waters, Muddy "Mississippi" Waters Live, The London Muddy Waters Session, and The Muddy Waters Woodstock Album, were released between 1971 and 1979. During his tenure with Waters, Smith is estimated to have participated in twelve sessions yielding eighty-four tracks.

In June 1980 Smith and other members of Muddy's band, Pinetop Perkins (piano), , Calvin Jones (bass), and Jerry Portnoy (harmonica), and Smith on drums, stuck out on their own, also recruiting veteran Chicago blues man Louis Myers (harmonica/guitar) to form The Legendary Blues Band, with the vocals shared by all. Later that year, Smith and the Legendary Blues Band appeared backing John Lee Hooker in the movie The Blues Brothers (1980). Smith was the only band member, besides Hooker, to appear onscreen in close-up. With varying personnel over the years, the Legendary Blues Band recorded seven albums, Life of Ease, Red Hot 'n' Blue, Woke Up with the Blues (nominated for a W. C. Handy Award), U B Da Judge, Prime Time Blues, and Money Talks, were recorded between 1981 to 1993. By the time Money Talks came out in 1993, Smith had become a very credible singer. The Legendary Blues Band toured with Bob Dylan, the Rolling Stones, and Eric Clapton.

His first solo recording started in 1995 with Bag Full of Blues, with Pinetop Perkins, harpist Kim Wilson, guitarists James Wheeler, Nick Moss, and Gareth Best, sticking with the Chicago blues sound. In 1999, Smith recorded with Muddy Waters son Big Bill Morganfield on his album Rising Son. Smith's album Way Back (2006), has 11 songs here, half of which he wrote. Backed by Bob Margolin and Frank Krakowski on guitar, Pinetop Perkins on piano, and guest shots by James Cotton and others. Willie's CD, Born in Arkansas, utilizes some of the best old-school blues players out there, including bassman Bob Stroger, pianist extraordinaire Barrelhouse Chuck, in-demand-by-everyone guitarist Billy Flynn, under-the-radar guitarist Little Frank Krakowski (who has worked with Willie for years) and top-notch drummer (as well as being Willie's son) Kenny "Beedy Eyes" Smith. In June 2010, Willie released Joined at the Hip with Pinetop Perkins. Joining these two in the studio were bassist Bob Stroger, Smith's son Kenny on drums, John Primer who was another Muddy Waters band alum, joins on lead guitar along with Frank Krakowski.

On February 13, 2011, he won a Grammy Award for Best Traditional Blues Album for Joined at the Hip, an album he recorded with Pinetop Perkins.
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Saturday, April 30, 2011

Marijuana Blues- Muddy Waters


Among Muddy Waters famous songs was the Marijuana blues. Pretty daring for his time.
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Go Mud!