CD submissions accepted! Guest writers always welcome!!

I started a quest to find terrific blues music and incredible musicianship when I was just a little kid. I also have a tremendous appreciation of fine musical instruments and equipment. One of my greatest joys all of my life was sharing my finds with my friends. I'm now publishing my journey. I hope that you come along!


Please email me at Info@Bmansbluesreport.com
Showing posts with label Hubert Sumlin. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Hubert Sumlin. Show all posts

Saturday, December 8, 2012

In The Valley - Willie Williams

Willie Williams (drums,) Hubert Sumlin (lead guitar), Willie "Pinetop" Perkins (piano), Eddie Taylor (g), Roy Lee Johnson (rhythm g), Odell, Joe Harper (bass), Carey Bell & Little Mack (harp) I can't find much about Willie Williams, a blues singer & drummer who recorded one album in the early 1970's. If anyone has anything on him please let me know. He's in good company! If you support live Blues acts, up and coming Blues talents and want to learn more about Blues news and Fathers of the Blues, ”LIKE” ---Bman’s Blues Report--- Facebook Page! I’m looking for great talent and trying to grow the audience for your favorite band! This is a pretty cool track but unfortunately the link is a bit messed up so please click video to hear the track. Video

Friday, November 16, 2012

Come On Home Baby - Hubert Sumlin & Sunnyland Slim

Hubert Sumlin (November 16, 1931 – December 4, 2011) was a Chicago blues guitarist and singer, best known for his "wrenched, shattering bursts of notes, sudden cliff-hanger silences and daring rhythmic suspensions" as a member of Howlin' Wolf's band. Sumlin was listed as number 43 in the Rolling Stone 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time. Sumlin played a 1955 Gibson Les Paul Goldtop guitar and a Louis Electric Model HS M12 amplifier. Born in Greenwood, Mississippi, Sumlin was raised in Hughes, Arkansas. He got his first guitar when he was eight years old. As a boy, Sumlin first met Howlin' Wolf by sneaking into a performance. When Wolf relocated from Memphis to Chicago in 1953, his long-time guitarist Willie Johnson chose not to join him. Upon his arrival in Chicago, Wolf first hired Chicago guitarist Jody Williams, and in 1954 Wolf invited Sumlin to relocate to Chicago to play second guitar in his Chicago-based band. Williams left the band in 1955, leaving Sumlin as the primary guitarist, a position he held almost continuously (except for a brief spell playing with Muddy Waters around 1956) for the remainder of Wolf's career. According to Sumlin, Howlin' Wolf sent Sumlin to a classical guitar instructor at the Chicago Conservatory of Music for a while to learn the keyboards and scales. Sumlin played on the album Howlin' Wolf, also called The Rockin' Chair Album, which was named the third greatest guitar album of all time by Mojo magazine in 2004. Upon Wolf's death in 1976, Sumlin continued on with several other members of Wolf's band under the name "The Wolf Pack" until about 1980. Sumlin also recorded under his own name, beginning with a session from a tour of Europe with Wolf in 1964. His final solo effort was About Them Shoes, released in 2004 by Tone-Cool Records. He underwent lung removal surgery the same year, yet continued performing until just before his death. Sumlin was inducted into the Blues Foundation Hall of Fame in 2008. He was nominated for four Grammy Awards: in 1999 for the album Tribute to Howlin' Wolf with Henry Gray, Calvin Jones, Sam Lay, and Colin Linden, in 2000 for Legends with Pinetop Perkins, in 2006 for his solo project About Them Shoes (which featured performances by Keith Richards, Eric Clapton, Levon Helm, David Johansen and James Cotton) and in 2010 for his participation on Kenny Wayne Shepherd's Live! in Chicago. He won multiple Blues Music Awards, and was a judge for the fifth annual Independent Music Awards to support independent artists' careers. He died on December 4, 2011, in a hospital in Wayne, New Jersey, of heart failure at the age of 80. Mick Jagger and Keith Richards paid Sumlin's funeral costs If you support live Blues acts, up and coming Blues talents and want to learn more about Blues news and Fathers of the Blues, ”LIKE” ---Bman’s Blues Report--- Facebook Page! I’m looking for great talent and trying to grow the audience for your favorite band!

Sunday, October 7, 2012

Smokestack Lightning - Don't Laugh At Me - Howlin Wolf with Clifton James

One of the best blues lineups you'd likely dream of. Howlin Wolf : Vocal Guitar Sunnyland Slim: Piano Hubert Sumlin: Guitar Willie Dixon: Bass Clifton James: Drums One of a half-dozen essential drummers from the Chicago scene, Clifton James was closely associated with the mighty guitar slinger Bo Diddley for 16 years. This places James front and center at the creation of one of the most important beats in rock music, known as the "Bo Diddley beat" -- as if there was anything else it could be called. Actually, there might just be some other things that this beat might be called, as it is traceable back to ceremonial drummers of the African nation of Burundi, as well as forward into the avant-garde rock of Captain Beefheart, who often credited this beat as being the source of most of his songs. Although in the latter case, at least one of his Magic Band drummers, Jimmy Carl Black, has indicated that the exact instructions were to "play the Bo Diddley beat backwards." James worked off and on with Diddley, who also adopted the African traditions of praising himself through song, from 1954 through 1970, and is also heard on straight-ahead Chicago blues recordings by artists such as Sonny Boy Williamson II, Muddy Waters, and Buddy Guy. The drummer was also one of the Chicago players who was involved in bringing this great genre of blues directly to audiences, when the public's interest in the style mushroomed in the '60s. As a member of the Chicago Blues All Stars in the late '60s, under the loose direction of bassist and songwriter Willie Dixon, he toured Europe, the United States, and Canada, hitting many cities where this style of blues had never been performed live. Other members of this group included pianist Sunnyland Slim, harmonica champ Shakey Walter Horton, and the fine guitarist Johnny Shines. He had also toured Europe in 1964 as part of an especially stripped down Howlin' Wolf quartet rounded out by Slim and Dixon. A live recording released by this outfit, although not legitimate, is certainly worth seeking out. Better known, but not as strong musically, are the European recordings of Sonny Boy Williamson II, which combined Chicago bluesmen with members of the British blues-rock combo the Yardbirds. Another all-star outfit was the Chicago Blues Band, which included both Shines and John Lee Hooker in the frontline, despite the fact that the latter blues great was not from the Windy City at all. The Super Super Blues Band The drummer was also a popular choice if a loose jam session was the order of the day, as he had a pleasant, giving personality that helped smooth out any rough spots that might occur between these highly competitive blues stars. Although albums such as Super Super Blues Band, featuring four of the top names in Chicago blues, or Two Great Guitars, which brings together archrivals Diddley and Chuck Berry, tend to be disappointing, the tracks show off the ease with which James can lay down a nice groove, even if the stars can't seem to think of anything to do on top. James was also granted the occasional vocal number when performing with these type of all-star outfits, and sang the blues with enough aplomb to make some listeners wish he had had more of a solo career. He has led bands occasionally, including a tour of Holland in the '70s. If you like what I’m doing, Like ---Bman’s Blues Report--- Facebook Page! I’m looking for great talent and trying to grow the audience for your favorites band! - ”LIKE”

Monday, August 27, 2012

Direct Music Distribution artist:The Bluesmasters - The Bluesmasters Volume Two - New Release Review


In dedication to Pinetop Perkins and Hubert Sumlin, both who played on this recording, a second volume of The Bluesmasters has been released. Featured are Mickey Thomas (vocals), Cassie Taylor (vocal and bass), hazel Miller (vocal),Eric Gakes (guitar) Rusty Anderson (guitar), Tim Tucker (guitar), Doug Lynn (harmonica), Aynsley Dunbar (drums), Larry Thompson (drums)and Ric Ulsky (Hammond B-3). First up is Sam Cooke's Bring It On Home To Me done jumps style with Taylor on vocals and Tucker kicking out a hot riff on guitar. Elmore James tune Talk To Me Baby gone swing shuffle again finds Taylor and Tucker rocking the joint with a cool harp riff from Lynn pushing Tucker on guitar. Johnnie Johnson standard Tanqueray gets a shuffle feel and Miller leads the way for a totally different feel altogether. Willie Dixon's I Just Want To Make Love To You gets a slinky feel. Don Nix ballad Same Old Blues features Taylor at her best and Tucker lays down a real strong guitar solo. I'd Rather Drink Muddy Water, made popular by Ella, features Thomas and Taylor trading lead vocals and Lynn on harp. Big Boss Man features Miller again on vocals stomping out the blues. Fine Cadillac done shuffle style features Gales on vocal and extensive guitar with Taylor and may be the best track on the recording. Thomas is back on Willie Dixon's Red Rooster and he sounds as good as ever. I particularly like the harp work by Lynn on this track. Robert Johnson's 3220 Blues is well managed by Taylor and group. Get Me A Car highlights Perkins on piano with Thomas on vocals alternating back and forth between the latin and shuffle rhythms. Jimmy Reed's Honest I Do again featuring Perkins and Taylor is done New Orleans style with some tasty guitar riffs added over top of the solid piano leading the way.

If you want some solid blues with traditional flavoring, this may be your ticket.

If you like what I’m doing, Like ---Bman’s Blues Report--- Facebook Page! I’m looking for great talent and trying to grow the audience for your favorites band! - ”LIKE”

Friday, April 20, 2012

I'M MAD - WILLIE MABON

With HUBERT SUMLIN, EDDIE TAYLOR, BOB STROGER AND ODIE PAYNEWillie Mabon (October 24, 1925 – April 19, 1985) was an American R&B singer, songwriter and pianist.Born Willie James Mabon, and brought up in Hollywood, Memphis, Tennessee, he had become known as a singer and pianist by the time he moved to Chicago in 1942. He formed a group, the Blues Rockers, and in 1949 began recording for the Aristocrat label. Mabon's debut solo release was made for the Apollo label on 28 August 1949 (Bogey Man/It Keeps Raining) and then Chess. His style contrasted with many Chess artistes – it was cool and jazzy, emphasising piano and saxophone rather than guitar and harmonica. His biggest success came in 1952 when his debut solo release, "I Don't Know",originally recorded for Al Benson's Parrot label 1050 and later the same year released on Chess with whom it had the hit topped the Billboard R&B chart for eight weeks. He picked it up from the older boogie-woogie pianist, Cripple Clarence Lofton. It was one of the most popular releases of its era, becoming Chess's biggest hit in the period before Chuck Berry's and Bo Diddley's success. It also became one of the first R&B hit records to be covered by a leading white artist, Tennessee Ernie Ford. Mabon's original was played on Alan Freed's early radio shows and also sold well to white audiences, crossing over markets at the start of the rock and roll era.Mabon returned to the top R&B slot in 1953 with "I'm Mad", and had another hit with the Mel London penned "Poison Ivy" in 1954. However, his career failed to maintain its momentum, and record releases in the late 1950s on a variety of record labels were largely unsuccessful. After a lull he repeated the process more modestly in the early 1960s with "Got To Have Some" and "I'm The Fixer".After moving to Paris in 1972, Mabon toured and recorded in Europe, including a 1977 album on Ornament Records.[4] He also performed at the Montreux Jazz Festival. In April 1985, after a long illness, Mabon died in Paris 

If you like what I’m doing, Like ---Bman’s Blues Report--- Facebook Page! I’m looking for great talent and trying to grow the audience for your favorites band! - ”LIKE”

 

Friday, March 23, 2012

Please Mr. Carter - Louisiana Red, Hubert Sumlin & Sunnyland Slim


Iverson Minter (March 23, 1932 – February 25, 2012), known as Louisiana Red, was an African American blues guitarist, harmonica player, and singer, who recorded more than 50 albums. He was best known for his song "Sweet Blood Call"
Born in Bessemer, Alabama, United States, Minter lost his parents early in life; His mother died of pneumonia shortly after his birth, and his father was lynched by the Ku Klux Klan when he was five. He was brought up by a series of relatives in various towns and cities. Red recorded for Chess in 1949, before joining the Army. After leaving the Army, he spent two years in the late 1950s playing with John Lee Hooker in Detroit. He recorded for Checker Records in 1952, billed as Rocky Fuller.
Michael Messer, from Michael Messer Music, noted on February 25, 2012: "I am very sorry to be bringer of such sad news that my dear friend, Louisiana Red, died this morning. He had a stroke on Monday and had been in a coma." Louisiana Red had died in Hanover, Germany, aged 79.
Like my Facebook Page, Post your video on my wall or post great blues photos or events! Share your favorite postings and get more exposure for your favorite band! - ”LIKE”

Thursday, March 22, 2012

I'm Sitting On Top Of The World - Willie Smith, Bob Stroger, Hubert Sumlin, Billy Flynn, Eddie Kobek


Pre-festival event for Grafton Blues Festival 2008, featuring Hubert Sumlin (guitar), Willie Smith (harp), Bob Stroger (bass), Eddie Kobek (drums), Billy Flynn (guitar). Bob Stroger played with Otis Rush and others. Willie Smith played drums for Muddy Waters for many years. Billy Flynn is the guitar sound of Muddy Waters and Chuck Berry and is heard on the Etta James music in the movie Cadillac Records.
Billy Flynn (born August 11, 1956) is an American Chicago blues and electric blues guitarist, singer and songwriter.

In addition to his own work, and those mentioned later, Flynn has worked and recorded with Bryan Lee, Little Smokey Smothers, Mark Hummel, Willie Kent, Snooky Pryor, Big Bill Morganfield, John Brim, Jody Williams, Little Arthur Duncan, Deitra Farr, and Billy Boy Arnold
Like my Facebook Page, Post your video on my Wall or post your Photos of great blues events! Share your favorite posting and get more exposure for your favorites band! ”LIKE”

Friday, December 23, 2011

Hubert Sumlin memorial tribute - Bob Corritore contributer

On Tuesday, December 13th, the legendary Hubert Sumlin was buried at Washington Memory Gardens in the Chicago suburb of Homewood, IL. He was laid to rest next to the grave site of his late wife per his wishes (thank you Toni Ann Mamary and Sam Burckhardt for making sure this happened). Later that night a major tribute happened at FitzGerald's in Berwyn, IL, a suburb just west of Chicago. Bob Margolin and I were the show coordinators for the night. The old school of Chicago blues came out in full force and were joined by some of the newer faces of traditional blues. Everyone was there to honor Hubert. The house band was Bob Margolin, Little Frank, Bob Stroger, Kenny Smith and Jimmy Mayes, and myself. Some of the many spectacular artists who appeared that night (I will miss some names -sorry in advance) were Eddie Shaw, Gary Martin (Hubert's nephew), Tail Dragger, Mary Lane, Billy Flynn, Scott Dirks, Rodney Brown, Lil' Ed, Tim Betts, Harlan Lee Terson, Jon Hiller, Tom Holland, Sam Lay, Mark Wydra, Mud Morganfield, Big Head Todd, Michael Frank, Billy Branch, Ronnie Baker Brooks, Wayne Baker Brooks, Dan Carelli, Melvin Smith, Jerry Porter, Zora Young, Jimmy Burns, Michael Coleman, Twist Turner, Kenneth Kinsey, Jonn Del Toro Richardson, Harry Garner, Deak Harp, Eddie C. Campbell, Nigel Mack, Brian Carpy, Vince Salerno, Marty Binder, Matt Hill, Richard Rosenblatt, Dave Herrero, Glenn Davis, Uncle Felix Reyes, and others. Some celebrities in the house who chose to just attend and not play were, Jody Williams, Joe Filisko, Sam Burckhardt, Nick Moss, Rick Kreher, Rich Kirch, Dave Katzman, and others. Also in the house was Tom Marker, blues host on WXRT. The place was packed from start to end with nothing but great music and love for Hubert filling the room. At the end of the night after a satisfying but exhausting night of coordination, I sat up talking with my longtime friend Tail Dragger, who's house I was staying at. We reflected on Hubert and the Howlin' Wolf and the blues in general. I flew back to Phoenix the next day. All in all, this night

Wednesday, December 14, 2011

Chicago Area Hubert Sumlin Musical Tribute at FitzGeralds - Friends of the Blues


As I indicated a few days ago, there was a Musical tribute at FitzGeralds Nightclub 6615 Roosevelt, Berwyn, IL 60402. Many thanks to all of the great musicians and friends who turned out last night to honor Hubert Sumlin and raise money for HART (Handy Artists Relief Trust). A photo slide show of some of the artists in action is shown below. Thanks to Friends of the Blues and Kurt Foor for the photos.

Photo's include Billy Branch, Bob Corritore, Bor Margolin, Bob Stronger, Eddie Shaw, Harry Garner, Lil Ed, Mary Lane, Matt Hill, David Antonio Hererro, Michael Frank, Mud Morganfield, Richard Rosenblatt, Ronnie Baker Brooks, Sam Lay, Tail Dragger, Tom Holland, Twist Turner, Wayne Baker Brooks, Zora Young and Dan Carelli.
Hubert Sumlin, a blues guitarist whose soulful licks and crackling solos were featured on scores of hits for singer Howlin' Wolf during the 1950s and 1960s and who influenced later work by Eric Clapton, Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughan, died Sunday in Wayne.at a hospital. in Wayne, N.J. He was 80.

His agent, Hugh Southard, said Mr. Sumlin had congestive heart failure.

Born in Greenwood, Miss.issippi, Mr. Sumlin lived in Milwaukee for most of his life before moving to Totowa 10 years ago.

Mr. Sumlin was among the last of a generation of musicians who helped modernize the blues with the electric guitar.

Write on our Facebook Wall or post your Photos of great blues events! Here

Monday, December 12, 2011

Chicago Area Hubert Sumlin Musical Tribute tonight at FitzGeralds - Bob Corritore


This evening, Tuesday, Dec 13th, Hubert Sumlin will be remembered with a musical tribute at FitzGerald's (http://www.fitzgeraldsnightclub.com/) 6615 W. Roosevelt Road, Berwyn, Illinois 60402, 7pm doors 8pm music, Donations will be accepted at door for the Blues Foundation HART Fund. Many musicians will honor Hubert this night. Bob Margolin and Bob Corritore will direct the proceedings with Little Frank, Bob Stroger, and Kenny "Beedy Eyes" Smith filling out the house band. Many artists are expected and so far confirmations include Eddie Shaw, Sam Lay, Tail Dragger, Mud Morganfield, Matt Hill, Jonn Del Toro Richardson, Richard Rosenblatt, Tom Holland, Jon Hiller, Billy Branch, Harlan Terson, Rich Kirch, Scott Dirks, Bob Riedy, Mark Wydra, Harry Garner, Nick Moss, Sam Burckhardt, Zora Young, Eddie C. Campbell, Mary Lane, Tim Betts, Dave Katzman, Big Head Todd and many others. Since Chicago is so rich with musicians who have had history with Hubert, you never know who will drop by.
“Like” Bman’s Facebook page (available in over 50 languages). I will not relay senseless nonsense. In this way I can get out the word on new talent, venues and blues happenings! - click Here
Here are two great legends...Hubert and Honeyboy.

Sunday, December 11, 2011

Hubert Sumlin Talks About Maxwell Street


Hubert Sumlin (November 16, 1931 – December 4, 2011) was an American Chicago blues and electric blues guitarist and singer.[1] He was best known for his celebrated work, from 1955, as guitarist in Howlin' Wolf's band. His singular playing was characterized by "wrenched, shattering bursts of notes, sudden cliff-hanger silences and daring rhythmic suspensions". Sumlin was listed as number 43 in the Rolling Stone 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time.

Sumlin favored a Louis Electric Model HS M12 amplifier and a 1955 Gibson Les Paul Goldtop guitarHubert Sumlin talks about playing on Maxwell Street in Chicago. For more on Hubert Sumlin, Chicago's Maxwell Street and the electric blues, check out the critically-acclaimed documentary, "Cheat You Fair: The Story of Maxwell Street"
“Like” Bman’s Facebook page (available in over 50 languages). I will not relay senseless nonsense. In this way I can get out the word on new talent, venues and blues happenings! - click Here

Thursday, December 8, 2011

RIP Hubert Sumlin - November 16, 1931 to December 4, 2011 - Bob Corritore correspondent


  • Best known for his extraordinary guitar work on the 1950s and 1960s recordings of Howlin' Wolf, Hubert Sumlin is considered among the greatest guitarists of all time. Hubert passed away of a heart attack on Sunday, Dec 4 after a long bout with respiratory illness. He was 80 years old. Though his health had been problematic for years, he continued to tour and delight concert and festival audiences until close to the end. Born in Greenville, Mississippi in 1931 and raised in Hughes, Arkansas, Hubert got his first guitar at age 6. Hubert was very interested in music and as a boy snuck into a nightclub to see Howlin' Wolf perform. Hubert's youthful enthusiasm won Wolf's heart, who took the young boy in and developed a father-like mentoring role with Hubert. Wolf would move to Chicago in 1953 and a year later would call for Hubert to move to Chicago to join his band. Initially Hubert  played a secondary role in the group with guitarist Jody Williams getting most of the limelight.  But when Jody left the band about 2 years later, Hubert became the star guitarist. Hubert's unorthodox approach, using innovative rhythmic textural lines and wild bursts of lead guitar, became an integral part of the Howlin' Wolf sound., Howlin' Wolf and Muddy Waters reportedly had a rivalry going as to who had the top blues band in Chicago (both were amazing bands) and for a short period of time Muddy recruited Hubert away from Wolf only to have Hubert return to Wolf's band and never leave again. Hubert's guitar was an essential and consistent part of the success of Wolf's recordings and live shows. The music achieved by the Wolf / Sumlin combination reached the highest of heights in the blues. When Howlin' Wolf recorded the London Sessions in 1970, Hubert began a life long relationship with UK blues artists like Eric Clapton and The Rolling Stones. In 1976, when Wolf died, Hubert was devastated. At first Eddie Shaw (Wolf's saxophonist) tried to keep the Howlin' Wolf band together but Hubert would drift: spending time in Austin, Texas under the care of Clifford Antone, or in Chicago where he stayed with Sunnyland Slim. In addition to recordings with Wolf, Hubert appeared on Chicago sessions with Eddie Shaw & The Wolf Gang, Andrew McMahon, Sunnyland Slim, Louisiana Red, Carey Bell, Little Eddie, Big Mac, and others. He recorded numerous albums under his own name for L+R, Black Top, Tone-Cool, Rykodisc, APO, JSP, Blind Pig, Blues Planet, Blues Special and other labels. At a point, under the guidance of manager Toni Ann Mamary, Hubert  started to get his due as the guitar legend he was. Hubert found himself hanging around and performing with rock stars, playing major festivals, and having his historic bio, Incurable Blues, published. He was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in 2008, Through all this notoriety, Hubert remained the kind, gentle soul with the same boyish enthusiasm that first befriended the Howlin' Wolf. His guitar playing was always intriguing, unorthodox, and impossible to copy. As he was bedridden and nearing the last hours of his life, his final request was to play his guitar one last  time. We thank Hubert for the light of joy he shined on the world and the heavenly music that he left for future generations to behold. He was our blues blessing. Special thanks to Hugh Southard of Blue Mountain Artists, Bob Margolin, and Little Frank who worked with him frequently on the road in recent years, Pat MorganJames Cotton, Paul Oscher, Kim Wilson, Amanda Taylor, Diunna Greenleaf, Twist Turner, Little Mike, and all his friends and fans who all were there at all times to support Hubert.
To see some amazing videos of Hubert Sumlin with the Howlin' Wolf:
"
“Like” Bman’s Facebook page (available in over 50 languages). I will not relay senseless nonsense. In this way I can get out the word on new talent, venues and blues happenings! - click Here
Hubert Sumlin Funeral Information:
Sunday, December 11, 2011 - Viewing and Receiving of guests
2- 4 PM & 7 - 9PM
Festa Memorial
111 Union Blvd.
Totowa, NJ 07512

Phone: (973) 790-8686
Monday, December 12, 2011 - Funeral Service10AM
Festa Memorial
111 Union Blvd.
Totowa, NJ 07512Phone: (973) 790-8686

Tuesday, December 13, 2011 - Chicago Area Musical Celebration Of Life

FitzGerald's

http://www.fitzgeraldsnightclub.com/

6615 W. Roosevelt Road, Berwyn, Illinois 60402

7pm doors, Donations accepted at door.

Many musicians will honor Hubert this night.

Sunday, December 4, 2011

Hubert Sumlin dead at 80


Hubert Sumlin, the longtime collaborator with Howlin' Wolf whose playing on such songs as "Wang Dang Doodle," "Spoonful" and "Backdoor Man" influenced generations of guitarists died Sunday in New Jersey. He was 80.

Sumlin was ranked number 43 on Rolling Stone’s list of the 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time and was a mainstay of the Chicago blues scene. He was inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in 2008. Sumlin influenced Keith Richards, Jimi Hendrix and Frank Zappa, among others.

Hubert Sumlin was born in Mississippi, raised in Arkansas and moved to Chicago to play with Howlin' Wolf. After Wolf's death in 1976, Sumlin continued to play with the rest of Wolf's band under the name The Wolf Gang.

He was diagnosed with lung cancer in 2002 and had a lung removed. In recent years Sumlin continued to perform when his health permitted.

Wednesday, November 16, 2011

Come On Home Baby - Hubert Sumlin & Sunnyland Slim


Hubert Sumlin (born November 16, 1931) is an American Chicago blues and electric blues guitarist and singer, best known for his celebrated work, from 1955, as guitarist in Howlin' Wolf's band. His singular playing is characterized by "wrenched, shattering bursts of notes, sudden cliff-hanger silences and daring rhythmic suspensions". Listed as number sixty-five in the Rolling Stone 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time, Sumlin continues to tour and play blues guitar.
“Like” Bman’s Facebook page. We use Facebook to spread the word about our blog. We will not hit you with 50 posts a day. We will not relay senseless nonsense. We use it only to draw attention to some of the key posts on our blog each day. In this way we can get out the word on new talent, venues and blues happenings! - click Here

Monday, August 15, 2011

AT BLUES -Doc Terry, Hubert Sumlin, Sunnyland Slim,



Hubert Sumlin (born November 16, 1931) is an American blues guitarist and singer, best known for his celebrated work, from 1955, as guitarist in Howlin' Wolf's band. His singular playing is characterized by "wrenched, shattering bursts of notes, sudden cliff-hanger silences and daring rhythmic suspensions". Listed as number sixty-five in the Rolling Stone 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time, Sumlin continues to tour and play blues guitar. He is cited as a major influence by many artists, including Eric Clapton, Keith Richards, Robbie Robertson, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Jimmy Page and Jimi Hendrix.

Albert "Sunnyland Slim" Luandrew (September 5, 1907 – March 17, 1995) was an American blues pianist, who was born in the Mississippi Delta and later moved to Chicago, to contribute to that city's post-war scene as a center for blues music. Chicago's broadcaster and writer, Studs Terkel, said Sunnyland Slim was "a living piece of our folk history, gallantly and eloquently carrying on in the old tradition
Get Facebook support for your favorite band or venue - click HERE

Friday, May 27, 2011

Hubert Sumlin - Interview


Hubert Sumlin (born November 16, 1931) is an American blues guitarist and singer, best known for his celebrated work, from 1955, as guitarist in Howlin' Wolf's band. His singular playing is characterized by "wrenched, shattering bursts of notes, sudden cliff-hanger silences and daring rhythmic suspensions". Listed as number sixty-five in the Rolling Stone 100 Greatest Guitarists of All Time, Sumlin continues to tour and play blues guitar. He is cited as a major influence by many artists, including Eric Clapton, Keith Richards, Robbie Robertson, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Jimmy Page and Jimi Hendrix.
Get Facebook support for your favorite band or venue - click HERE