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I started a quest to find terrific blues music and incredible musicianship when I was just a little kid. I also have a tremendous appreciation of fine musical instruments and equipment. One of my greatest joys all of my life was sharing my finds with my friends. I'm now publishing my journey. I hope that you come along!


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Showing posts with label Eddie Taylor. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Eddie Taylor. Show all posts

Saturday, December 8, 2012

In The Valley - Willie Williams

Willie Williams (drums,) Hubert Sumlin (lead guitar), Willie "Pinetop" Perkins (piano), Eddie Taylor (g), Roy Lee Johnson (rhythm g), Odell, Joe Harper (bass), Carey Bell & Little Mack (harp) I can't find much about Willie Williams, a blues singer & drummer who recorded one album in the early 1970's. If anyone has anything on him please let me know. He's in good company! If you support live Blues acts, up and coming Blues talents and want to learn more about Blues news and Fathers of the Blues, ”LIKE” ---Bman’s Blues Report--- Facebook Page! I’m looking for great talent and trying to grow the audience for your favorite band! This is a pretty cool track but unfortunately the link is a bit messed up so please click video to hear the track. Video

Friday, December 7, 2012

Blind John Davis & Eddie Taylor

Blind John Davis (December 7, 1913 — October 12, 1985) was an African American, blues, jazz and boogie-woogie pianist and singer. He is best remembered for his recordings including "A Little Every Day" and "Everybody's Boogie" Davis was born in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, but he relocated with his family to Chicago at the age of two. Seven years later he had lost his sight. In his early years Davis backed Merline Johnson, and by his mid-twenties he was a well known and reliable accompanying pianist. Between 1937 and 1942, Davis recorded with Big Bill Broonzy, Sonny Boy Williamson I, Tampa Red, Merline Johnson, and others, playing on many recordings of that time. He also waxed several efforts of his own, using his own lightweight voice. After playing on various earlier recording sessions with him, in the 1940s Davis teamed up with Lonnie Johnson. Recording later on his own, "No Mail Today" (1949) became a minor hit for Davis. Most of Doctor Clayton's later recordings featured Davis on piano. He toured Europe with Broonzy in 1952, the first blues pianist to do so. In later years Davis toured and recorded frequently in Europe, where he enjoyed a higher profile than in his homeland. Davis died in his adopted home town of Chicago, at the age of 71, in October 1985. If you support live Blues acts, up and coming Blues talents and want to learn more about Blues news and Fathers of the Blues, Like ---Bman’s Blues Report--- Facebook Page! I’m looking for great talent and trying to grow the audience for your favorites band! ”LIKE”

Friday, April 20, 2012

I'M MAD - WILLIE MABON

With HUBERT SUMLIN, EDDIE TAYLOR, BOB STROGER AND ODIE PAYNEWillie Mabon (October 24, 1925 – April 19, 1985) was an American R&B singer, songwriter and pianist.Born Willie James Mabon, and brought up in Hollywood, Memphis, Tennessee, he had become known as a singer and pianist by the time he moved to Chicago in 1942. He formed a group, the Blues Rockers, and in 1949 began recording for the Aristocrat label. Mabon's debut solo release was made for the Apollo label on 28 August 1949 (Bogey Man/It Keeps Raining) and then Chess. His style contrasted with many Chess artistes – it was cool and jazzy, emphasising piano and saxophone rather than guitar and harmonica. His biggest success came in 1952 when his debut solo release, "I Don't Know",originally recorded for Al Benson's Parrot label 1050 and later the same year released on Chess with whom it had the hit topped the Billboard R&B chart for eight weeks. He picked it up from the older boogie-woogie pianist, Cripple Clarence Lofton. It was one of the most popular releases of its era, becoming Chess's biggest hit in the period before Chuck Berry's and Bo Diddley's success. It also became one of the first R&B hit records to be covered by a leading white artist, Tennessee Ernie Ford. Mabon's original was played on Alan Freed's early radio shows and also sold well to white audiences, crossing over markets at the start of the rock and roll era.Mabon returned to the top R&B slot in 1953 with "I'm Mad", and had another hit with the Mel London penned "Poison Ivy" in 1954. However, his career failed to maintain its momentum, and record releases in the late 1950s on a variety of record labels were largely unsuccessful. After a lull he repeated the process more modestly in the early 1960s with "Got To Have Some" and "I'm The Fixer".After moving to Paris in 1972, Mabon toured and recorded in Europe, including a 1977 album on Ornament Records.[4] He also performed at the Montreux Jazz Festival. In April 1985, after a long illness, Mabon died in Paris 

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Saturday, March 31, 2012

Mud Morganfield CD Release Party Saturday at Legends!


On March 20 Severn Records released the first national release by Mud Morganfield, the eldest son of Muddy Waters. This release is called Son Of The Seventh Son and it has already received about 20 rave reviews which you can read by clicking here. A CD release party is planned for Saturday night, March 31st at Buddy Guy's Legends with an opening set by Eddie Taylor, Jr. before Mud and band take the stage! Mud Morganfield's band that night will consist of Rick Kreher, Barrelhouse Chuck, Kenny "Beedy Eyes" Smith, E.G. McDaniel, Harmonica Hinds and Bob Corritore plus guest appearances by Katherine Davis and Deitra plus a few surprises! Copies of Son Of The Seventh Son will be available that night. Buddy Guy's Legends is located at 700 S. Wabash, Chicago, IL 60605. Also Mud and the band will make a live televised appearance Friday morning, March 30 on Chicago's WGN and this broadcast is available throughout the USA.



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Sunday, January 29, 2012

Groundhog Blues - Blind John Davis, Eddie Taylor


The piano work of John Davis was featured on blues records by the score during the '30s and '40s. His accompaniments to Tampa Red, Sonny Boy Williamson, Big Bill Broonzy, and others brought him fame as a blues musician, but like his piano compatriot Little Brother Montgomery, Davis did not care to be typecast as such and often expressed a preference for the sweet, sentimental favorites he played in countless piano lounges. But as with Montgomery, most of Davis's own recording opportunities came from blues companies, and he never failed to acquit himself well when it came to blues and boogie-woogie. He was the first pianist to do a European blues tour (with Broonzy in 1952), returning to the continent frequently as a solo act during the '70s and '80s. With blues-piano appreciation in Europe being what it is and has been, it's not surprising that most of the albums of Blind John Davis were recorded there and not in Chicago, his home from the age of two until his death.

Eddie Taylor (January 29, 1923 – December 25, 1985) was an American electric blues guitarist and singer.
Born Edward Taylor in Benoit, Mississippi, United States, as a boy Taylor taught himself to play the guitar. He spent his early years playing at venues around Leland, Mississippi, where he taught his friend Jimmy Reed to play guitar. With a guitar style deeply rooted in the Mississippi Delta tradition, in 1949 Taylor moved to Chicago, Illinois.

While Taylor never achieved the stardom of some of his compatriots in the Chicago blues scene, he nevertheless was an integral part of that era. He is especially noted as a main accompanist for Jimmy Reed, as well as working with John Lee Hooker, Big Walter Horton, Sam Lay and others. Taylor's own records "Big Town Playboy" and "Bad Boy" on Vee Jay Records became local hits in the 1950s.

Taylor's son Eddie Taylor Jr. is a blues guitarist in Chicago, his stepson Larry Taylor is a blues drummer and vocalist, and his daughter Demetria is a blues vocalist in Chicago. Taylor's wife Vera was the niece of bluesmen Eddie "Guitar" Burns and Jimmy Burns.

Taylor died on Christmas Day in 1985 in Chicago,[4] at age 62, and was interred in an unmarked grave in the Restvale Cemetery in Alsip, Illinois. He was posthumously inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in 1987.
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Sunday, December 25, 2011

BAD BOY - Eddie Taylor


Eddie Taylor (January 29, 1923 – December 25, 1985) was an American electric blues guitarist and singer
Born Edward Taylor in Benoit, Mississippi, United States, as a boy Taylor taught himself to play the guitar. He spent his early years playing at venues around Leland, Mississippi, where he taught his friend Jimmy Reed to play guitar. With a guitar style deeply rooted in the Mississippi Delta tradition, in 1949 Taylor moved to Chicago, Illinois.

While Taylor never achieved the stardom of some of his compatriots in the Chicago blues scene, he nevertheless was an integral part of that era. He is especially noted as a main accompanist for Jimmy Reed, as well as working with John Lee Hooker, Big Walter Horton, Sam Lay and others. Taylor's own records "Big Town Playboy" and "Bad Boy" on Vee Jay Records became local hits in the 1950s.

Taylor's son Eddie Taylor Jr. is a blues guitarist in Chicago, his stepson Larry Taylor is a blues drummer and vocalist, and his daughter Demetria is a blues vocalist in Chicago. Taylor's wife Vera was the niece of bluesmen Eddie "Guitar" Burns and Jimmy Burns.

Taylor died on Christmas Day in 1985 in Chicago, at age 62, and was interred in an unmarked grave in the Restvale Cemetery in Alsip, Illinois. He was posthumously inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in 1987.
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Friday, July 29, 2011

Tribute to Elmore - Sunnyland Slim & Eddie Taylor


Eddie Taylor (January 29, 1923 – December 25, 1985) was an American blues guitarist and singer.
Born Edward Taylor in Benoit, Mississippi, as a boy Taylor taught himself to play the guitar. He spent his early years playing at venues around Leland, Mississippi, where he taught his friend Jimmy Reed to play guitar. With a guitar style deeply rooted in the Mississippi Delta tradition, in 1949 Taylor moved to Chicago.

While Taylor never achieved the stardom of some of his compatriots in the Chicago Blues scene, he nevertheless was an integral part of that era and is especially noted as a main accompanist for Jimmy Reed as well as working with John Lee Hooker, Big Walter Horton and others. Taylor's own records "Big Town Playboy" and "Bad Boy" on Vee Jay Records became local hits in the 1950s.

Taylor's son Eddie Taylor Jr. is a blues guitarist in Chicago, his stepson Larry Taylor is a blues drummer and vocalist, and his daughter Demetria is a blues vocalist in Chicago. . Taylor's wife Vera was the niece of bluesmen Eddie "Guitar" Burns and Jimmy Burns.

Taylor died on Christmas Day in 1985 in Chicago, at age 62, and was interred in an unmarked grave in the Restvale Cemetery in Alsip, Illinois. He was posthumously inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in 1987.

Albert "Sunnyland Slim" Luandrew (September 5, 1907 – March 17, 1995) was an American blues pianist, who was born in the Mississippi Delta and later moved to Chicago, to contribute to that city's post-war scene as a center for blues music.[2] Chicago's broadcaster and writer, Studs Terkel, said Sunnyland Slim was "a living piece of our folk history, gallantly and eloquently carrying on in the old tradition."
Sunnyland Slim was born in 1906 on a farm in Quitman County, near Vance, Mississippi (some sources erroneously give this date as 1907). He moved to Memphis, Tennessee in 1925, where he performed with many of the popular blues musicians of the day. His stage name came from a song he composed about the Sunnyland train that ran between Memphis and St. Louis, Missouri. In 1942 he followed the great migration of southern workers to the industrial north in Chicago.

At that time the electric blues was taking shape there, and through the years Sunnyland Slim played with such musicians as Muddy Waters, Howlin' Wolf, Robert Lockwood, Jr., and Little Walter. His piano style is characterised by heavy basses or vamping chords in the left hand and tremolos with his right. His voice was loud and he sang in a declamatory style.

Sunnyland Slim's first recording was as a singer with Jump Jackson's band on the Specialty label in September 1946. His first recordings as a leader were on the Hy-Tone and Aristocrat labels in late 1947. Slim continued performing until his death in 1995.

He had released one record on RCA Victor using the moniker 'Dr. Clayton's Buddy': "Illinois Central" b/w "Sweet Lucy Blues" (Victor 20-2733).

In 1988 he was awarded a National Heritage Fellowship.

Sunnyland Slim died in March 1995 in Chicago, after complications from renal failure, at the age of 88.

Sunday, June 12, 2011

BAD BOY - EDDIE TAYLOR - Luther Tucker - Sunnyland Slim


Born Edward Taylor in Benoit, Mississippi, as a boy Taylor taught himself to play the guitar. He spent his early years playing at venues around Leland, Mississippi, where he taught his friend Jimmy Reed to play guitar. With a guitar style deeply rooted in the Mississippi Delta tradition, in 1949 Taylor moved to Chicago.
Eddie Taylor (January 29, 1923 – December 25, 1985) was an American blues guitarist and singer.
While Taylor never achieved the stardom of some of his compatriots in the Chicago Blues scene, he nevertheless was an integral part of that era and is especially noted as a main accompanist for Jimmy Reed as well as working with John Lee Hooker, Big Walter Horton and others. Taylor's own records "Big Town Playboy" and "Bad Boy" on Vee Jay Records became local hits in the 1950s.

Taylor's son Eddie Taylor Jr. is a blues guitarist in Chicago, his stepson Larry Taylor is a blues drummer and vocalist, and his daughter Demetria is a blues vocalist in Chicago. . Taylor's wife Vera was the niece of bluesmen Eddie "Guitar" Burns and Jimmy Burns.

Taylor died on Christmas Day in 1985 in Chicago, at age 62, and was interred in an unmarked grave in the Restvale Cemetery in Alsip, Illinois. He was posthumously inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in 1987.
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