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I started a quest to find terrific blues music and incredible musicianship when I was just a little kid. I also have a tremendous appreciation of fine musical instruments and equipment. One of my greatest joys all of my life was sharing my finds with my friends. I'm now publishing my journey. I hope that you come along!


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Showing posts with label Odie Payne. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Odie Payne. Show all posts

Friday, January 15, 2016

Delmark Records artist: Magic Sam Blues Band - Black Magic - New Release Review

I just received the newest release, Black Magic, from Magic Sam Blues Band and it's nothing short of great! Magic Sam passed only days before the original release of Black Magic back in 1969 and this shows Sam with his allstar studded band and a few additional/alternate tracks. Opening with Roscoe Gordon's, I Just Want A little Bit, Sam leads the way on guitar and vocal for a snappy blues rocker. The great Eddie Shaw is right there blowing a great sax solo and Sam handles guitar with Mighty Joe Young. What Have I Done Wrong has a cool R&B underpinning supported by Lafayette Leake on piano, Mac Thompson on bass, and Odie Payne on drums. Willie Dixion's classic, Easy Baby has a super soul feel with strong horn work from Shaw. With it's Boogaloo style, Sam has this track hopping. Slick guitar work and rolling rhythm gives this track extra spark. Lowell Fulsom's, It's All Your Fault Baby has a great unique take showcasing Sam's vocal styling and tidy guitar riffs. Shaw's sax work gives the track depth and classic double stops and beautiful guitar runs make this one of my personal favorites on the release. Don Nix's Same Old Blues has a great swing and excellent solo's from both Sam and Eddie. Excellent! I really love Sam's take on You Don't Love Me Baby with a great tempo and spicy riffs from Shaw and Sam. Freddie King's San-Ho-Zay is a crisp rocker with Sam hittin the strings just right. You Better Stop is a really nice slow blues number with fluid "Magic Sam" riffs over Eddie Shaw tone and Leake piano riffs giving it just perfect balance on Payne's snappy drumming. Excellent! Otis Rush's Keep On Loving Me, Baby really gets up and goes. Sam leads the way with clean, simple guitar riffs, echoed by Shaw and grounded by Thompson and Payne. What Have I Done Wrong (alt)is tight with alternate vocal tracks. The alternate on I Just Want A Little Bit has some great sax work by Shaw so make certain you catch this! The alternate on Everything's Gonna Be Alright has a great feel and stinging guitar solo. Keep On Doing What Your Doing has a great Chicago feel with warm sax from Harris and cool guitar riffs from Sam, coupled with his soulful vocals...very nice! Blues For Odie Payne is a real hot one with Sam and Young each taking an excellent solo before letting Eddie off the chain for a super solo as well. Excellent! The alternate for Same Old Blues has a great groove and Sam is in it. Dig his guitar phrasing on this one! The alternate 2 on What Have I Done Wrong is a great R&B number with super vocals and close work between Shaw and Sam. Wrapping the release is the alternate to Keep On Loving Me, Baby with high energy and powerful vocals. Sam's guitar work is clean and concise speeding to a conclusion about to erupt. Excellent ending to an excellent release! Also included is an excellent 16 page booklet with some great photos and notes not published before.

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Monday, August 27, 2012

Odie Payne & Robert Jr Lockwood


Odie Payne (August 27, 1926 – March 1, 1989) was an American Chicago blues drummer. Over his long career Payne worked with a range of musicians including Sonny Boy Williamson II, Muddy Waters, Jimmy Rogers, Eddie Taylor, Little Johnny Jones, Tampa Red, Otis Rush, Yank Rachell, Sleepy John Estes, Little Brother Montgomery, Memphis Minnie, Magic Sam, Chuck Berry, and Buddy Guy
He was born Odie Payne Jr. in Chicago, Illinois. Payne was interested in music from an early age, and did not restrict himself to a narrow musical genre. He studied music in high school and later drafted into the Army, but upon his discharge, Payne graduated from the Roy C. Knapp School of Percussion. By 1949 Payne was playing along with the pianist Little Johnny Jones, before meeting Tampa Red and enlisting into his band. The association lasted for around three years before, in 1952, Payne and Jones joined Elmore James's band, the Broomdusters.

Payne played with the Broomdusters for another three years, although his recording association with them lasted through to 1959. In total he recorded thirty one singles with them, including "The Sky Is Crying". By this time Payne had become a favored session musician appearing through that decade on the Cobra label, with Otis Rush, Magic Sam, and Buddy Guy. His playing also can be heard on various Chess records, including the Chuck Berry hit singles "Nadine", "You Never Can Tell", "Promised Land" and 1964's "No Particular Place to Go." All appeared on the Berry's 1982 compilation album, The Great Twenty-Eight.

Noted for his usage of the cowbell, bass drum pedal, and extended cymbal and drum rolls, Payne's double shuffle drumming technique was much copied and utilised by both Fred Below and Sam Lay. The technique called for Payne to use both his hands to effect the shuffle effect.

Payne appears to have a songwriting credit to his name for the song "Say Man," which was recorded by both Bo Diddley and Willie Mabon; although Payne's name certainly did not appear on every version published.

Odie Payne died in Chicago in March 1989, at the age of 62.
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Friday, April 20, 2012

I'M MAD - WILLIE MABON

With HUBERT SUMLIN, EDDIE TAYLOR, BOB STROGER AND ODIE PAYNEWillie Mabon (October 24, 1925 – April 19, 1985) was an American R&B singer, songwriter and pianist.Born Willie James Mabon, and brought up in Hollywood, Memphis, Tennessee, he had become known as a singer and pianist by the time he moved to Chicago in 1942. He formed a group, the Blues Rockers, and in 1949 began recording for the Aristocrat label. Mabon's debut solo release was made for the Apollo label on 28 August 1949 (Bogey Man/It Keeps Raining) and then Chess. His style contrasted with many Chess artistes – it was cool and jazzy, emphasising piano and saxophone rather than guitar and harmonica. His biggest success came in 1952 when his debut solo release, "I Don't Know",originally recorded for Al Benson's Parrot label 1050 and later the same year released on Chess with whom it had the hit topped the Billboard R&B chart for eight weeks. He picked it up from the older boogie-woogie pianist, Cripple Clarence Lofton. It was one of the most popular releases of its era, becoming Chess's biggest hit in the period before Chuck Berry's and Bo Diddley's success. It also became one of the first R&B hit records to be covered by a leading white artist, Tennessee Ernie Ford. Mabon's original was played on Alan Freed's early radio shows and also sold well to white audiences, crossing over markets at the start of the rock and roll era.Mabon returned to the top R&B slot in 1953 with "I'm Mad", and had another hit with the Mel London penned "Poison Ivy" in 1954. However, his career failed to maintain its momentum, and record releases in the late 1950s on a variety of record labels were largely unsuccessful. After a lull he repeated the process more modestly in the early 1960s with "Got To Have Some" and "I'm The Fixer".After moving to Paris in 1972, Mabon toured and recorded in Europe, including a 1977 album on Ornament Records.[4] He also performed at the Montreux Jazz Festival. In April 1985, after a long illness, Mabon died in Paris 

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Friday, March 2, 2012

I Don't Know - Odie Payne w/ Robert Jr. Lockwood


Odie Payne (vocal & drums) Robert Jr Lockwood (guitar) Gene Schwartz (bass) and Sumito Ariyoshi (piano)
Odie Payne (August 27, 1926 – March 1, 1989) was an American Chicago blues drummer. Over his long career Payne worked with a range of musicians including Sonny Boy Williamson II, Muddy Waters, Jimmy Rogers, Eddie Taylor, Little Johnny Jones, Tampa Red, Otis Rush, Yank Rachell, Sleepy John Estes, Little Brother Montgomery, Memphis Minnie, Magic Sam, Chuck Berry, and Buddy Guy.
He was born Odie Payne Jr. in Chicago, Illinois. Payne was interested in music from an early age, and did not restrict himself to a narrow musical genre. He studied music in high school and later drafted into the Army, but upon his discharge, Payne graduated from the Roy C. Knapp School of Percussion. By 1949 Payne was playing along with the pianist Little Johnny Jones, before meeting Tampa Red and enlisting into his band. The association lasted for around three years before, in 1952, Payne and Jones joined Elmore James's band, the Broomdusters.

Payne played with the Broomdusters for another three years, although his recording association with them lasted through to 1959. In total he recorded thirty one singles with them, including "The Sky Is Crying". By this time Payne had become a favored session musician appearing through that decade on the Cobra label, with Otis Rush, Magic Sam, and Buddy Guy. His playing also can be heard on various Chess records, including the Chuck Berry hit singles "Nadine", "You Never Can Tell", "Promised Land" and 1964's "No Particular Place to Go." All appeared on the Berry's 1982 compilation album, The Great Twenty-Eight.

Noted for his usage of the cowbell, bass drum pedal, and extended cymbal and drum rolls, Payne's double shuffle drumming technique was much copied and utilised by both Fred Below and Sam Lay. The technique called for Payne to use both his hands to effect the shuffle effect.

Payne appears to have a songwriting credit to his name for the song "Say Man," which was recorded by both Bo Diddley and Willie Mabon; although Payne's name certainly did not appear on every version published.

Odie Payne died in Chicago in March 1989, at the age of 62.
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