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Showing posts with label Luther Allison. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Luther Allison. Show all posts

Tuesday, October 9, 2018

Luther Allison Box Set to be Released November 17th


RUF RECORDS TO RELEASE SET ON NOVEMBER 17TH






The box set celebrating the 20th anniversary of the passing of blues legend Luther Allison will take the blues world by storm upon its release on November 17th. The pressing has been limited to 1500 CD sets, and contains the essential albums recorded by Luther during his Motown years. To compliment this massive array of music is an 88-page coffee table book written by Art Tipaldi featuring Luther’s inspiring story, comments from his friends and associates and many rare and private photos. In addition, the box is chock full of video footage. Included are performances from 1997 (Live in Paradise and Zoo Bar), 1991 ( A concert in Germany with Luther playing alongside his son Bernard), 1987 (a show from East Berlin.) The 1996 performance at the W.C. Handy Awards packs the power and excitement of Luther’s typical 3-hour shows into a riveting and relentless 15-minute blues set. This particular performance was the climax of his astonishing career. Luther stole the show by performing and taking home five awards, including Blues Entertainer of the Year.



Luther Allison is a genuine blues hero with an incomparable expanse of energy and love for his music and the people who love it.






The box includes 7 CD’s & 4 DVD’s

Montreux (1976)

Let’s Try it Again – Live ’89 (1989)

Hand Me Down My Moonshine (1992)

Bad Love (1994)

Blue Streak (1995)

Reckless (1997)

Life is a Bitch (1984)



DVD’s

Im Konzert – Live in East Berlin (1987)

Ohne Filter (1991) with Bernard Allison

Live in Paradise (1997)

Just Memories including Zoo Bar, Lincoln NE (1997), WC Handy Awards, Memphis TN (1997) + Bonus Material (Bad Love video clip, Luther interview and tribute.)


Wednesday, August 17, 2011

SONGS FROM THE ROAD - LUTHER ALLISON



Luther Allison (August 17, 1939 – August 12, 1997) was an American blues guitarist. He was born in Widener, Arkansas and moved with his family, at age twelve, to Chicago in 1951. He taught himself guitar and began listening to blues extensively. Three years later he began hanging outside blues nightclubs with the hopes of being invited to perform. He played with Howlin' Wolf's band and backed James Cotton.

His big break came in 1957 when Muddy Waters invited Allison to the stage. He worked the club circuit throughout the late 1950s and early 1960s and recorded his first single in 1965. Allison was signed to the Delmark Records label in 1967 and released his debut album Love Me Mama the following year. A well-received set at the 1969 Ann Arbor Blues Festival resulted in his being asked to perform there each of the next three years. He also toured nationwide and, in 1972, was signed to Motown Records, the first and one of the few blues artists to do so.[3] By the mid 1970s he began touring Europe and moved to France in 1977. He would not return to the United States for another fifteen years. Allison was known for his concert performances, lengthy guitar solos and crowd walking with his Gibson Les Paul.



Allison's manager, and European agent, Thomas Ruf founded the label Ruf Records in 1994. Signing with Ruf Records, Allison launched a comeback in association with Alligator Records. Alligator founder, Bruce Iglauer, convinced Allison to return to the United States. The album Soul Fixin' Man was recorded and released in 1994, and Allison toured the U.S. and Canada. Allison won four W.C. Handy Awards in 1994. With the James Solberg Band backing him, non-stop touring and the release of Blue Streak (featuring song "Cherry Red Wine"), Allison continued to earn more Handys and gain wider recognition. Allison scored a host of Living Blues Awards and was featured on the cover pages of major blues publications.



He appeared at the 1995 San Francisco Blues Festival.



Allison covered "You Can't Always Get What You Want" for the 1997 Rolling Stones' tribute album, Paint it Blue: Songs of the Rolling Stones.



In the middle of his summer of 1997 tour, Allison checked into a hospital for dizziness and loss of coordination. It was discovered that he had a tumor on his lung that had metastasized to his brain. In and out of a coma, Allison died on August 12, 1997, five days before his 58th birthday, in Madison, Wisconsin.[2] His album Reckless had just been released. His son Bernard Allison, at one time a member of his band, is now a solo recording artist.
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Thursday, August 4, 2011

Just As I Am - Luther Allison


Luther Allison (August 17, 1939 – August 12, 1997) was an American blues guitarist. He was born in Widener, Arkansas and moved with his family, at age twelve, to Chicago in 1951.
He taught himself guitar and began listening to blues extensively. Three years later he began hanging outside blues nightclubs with the hopes of being invited to perform. He played with Howlin' Wolf's band and backed James Cotton.
His big break came in 1957 when Muddy Waters invited Allison to the stage. He worked the club circuit throughout the late 1950s and early 1960s and recorded his first single in 1965. Allison was signed to the Delmark Records label in 1967 and released his debut album Love Me Mama the following year. A well-received set at the 1969 Ann Arbor Blues Festival resulted in his being asked to perform there each of the next three years. He also toured nationwide and, in 1972, was signed to Motown Records, the first and one of the few blues artists to do so. By the mid 1970s he began touring Europe and moved to France in 1977. He would not return to the United States for another fifteen years. Allison was known for his concert performances, lengthy guitar solos and crowd walking with his Gibson Les Paul.

Allison's manager, and European agent, Thomas Ruf founded the label Ruf Records in 1994. Signing with Ruf Records, Allison launched a comeback in association with Alligator Records. Alligator founder, Bruce Iglauer, convinced Allison to return to the United States. The album Soul Fixin' Man was recorded and released in 1994, and Allison toured the U.S. and Canada. Allison won four W.C. Handy Awards in 1994. With the James Solberg Band backing him, non-stop touring and the release of Blue Streak (featuring song "Cherry Red Wine"), Allison continued to earn more Handys and gain wider recognition. Allison scored a host of Living Blues Awards and was featured on the cover pages of major blues publications.

He appeared at the 1995 San Francisco Blues Festival.

Allison covered "You Can't Always Get What You Want" for the 1997 Rolling Stones' tribute album, Paint it Blue: Songs of the Rolling Stones.

In the middle of his summer of 1997 tour, Allison checked into a hospital for dizziness and loss of coordination. It was discovered that he had a tumor on his lung that had metastasized to his brain. In and out of a coma, Allison died on August 12, 1997, five days before his 58th birthday, in Madison, Wisconsin. His album Reckless had just been released. His son Bernard Allison, at one time a member of his band, is now a solo recording artist.

He was posthumously inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in 1998. In 2000, the Chicago Sun-Times called him "The Bruce Springsteen of the blues".

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Saturday, May 14, 2011

Living in the House of the Blues Luther Allison

Before there was Bernard Allison...there was big daddy...Luther Allison.


Luther Allison (August 17, 1939 – August 12, 1997) was an American blues guitarist. He was born in Widener, Arkansas and moved with his family, at age twelve, to Chicago in 1951. He taught himself guitar and began listening to blues extensively. Three years later he began hanging outside blues nightclubs with the hopes of being invited to perform. He played with Howlin' Wolf's band and backed James Cotton.

His big break came in 1957 when Muddy Waters invited Allison to the stage. He worked the club circuit throughout the late 1950s and early 1960s and recorded his first single in 1965. Allison was signed to the Delmark Records label in 1967 and released his debut album Love Me Mama the following year. A well-received set at the 1969 Ann Arbor Blues Festival resulted in his being asked to perform there each of the next three years. He also toured nationwide and, in 1972, was signed to Motown Records, the first and one of the few blues artists to do so. By the mid 1970s he began touring Europe and moved to France in 1977.[3] He would not return to the United States for another fifteen years. Allison was known for his concert performances, lengthy guitar solos and crowd walking with his Gibson Les Paul.

Allison's manager, and European agent, Thomas Ruf founded the label Ruf Records in 1994. Signing with Ruf Records, Allison launched a comeback in association with Alligator Records. Alligator founder, Bruce Iglauer, convinced Allison to return to the United States. The album Soul Fixin' Man was recorded and released in 1994, and Allison toured the U.S. and Canada. Allison won four W.C. Handy Awards in 1994. With the James Solberg Band backing him, non-stop touring and the release of Blue Streak (featuring song "Cherry Red Wine"), Allison continued to earn more Handys and gain wider recognition. Allison scored a host of Living Blues Awards and was featured on the cover pages of major blues publications.

He appeared at the 1995 San Francisco Blues Festival.

Allison covered "You Can't Always Get What You Want" for the 1997 Rolling Stones' tribute album, Paint it Blue: Songs of the Rolling Stones.

In the middle of his summer of 1997 tour, Allison checked into a hospital for dizziness and loss of coordination. It was discovered that he had a tumor on his lung that had metastasized to his brain. In and out of a coma, Allison died on August 12, 1997, five days before his 58th birthday, in Madison, Wisconsin.[2] His album Reckless had just been released. His son Bernard Allison, at one time a member of his band, is now a solo recording artist.

He was posthumously inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame in 1998. In 2000, the Chicago Sun-Times called him "The Bruce Springsteen of the blues".

Allison is buried at Washington Memory Gardens Cemetery in Homewood, Illinois.
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