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I started a quest to find terrific blues music and incredible musicianship when I was just a little kid. I also have a tremendous appreciation of fine musical instruments and equipment. One of my greatest joys all of my life was sharing my finds with my friends. I'm now publishing my journey. I hope that you come along!


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Showing posts with label Indiana. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Indiana. Show all posts

Friday, June 15, 2012

West Coast Blues - Wes Montgomery


John Leslie "Wes" Montgomery (March 6, 1923 – June 15, 1968) was an American jazz guitarist. He is widely considered one of the major jazz guitarists, emerging after such seminal figures as Django Reinhardt and Charlie Christian and influencing countless others, including Pat Martino, George Benson, Russell Malone, Emily Remler, Kenny Burrell, Pat Metheny, Steve Howe, and Jimi Hendrix.
Montgomery was born in Indianapolis, Indiana. According to NPR Jazz Profiles "The Life and Music Of Wes Montgomery," the nickname "Wes" was a child's abbreviation of his middle name, Leslie. He came from a musical family; his brothers, Monk (string bass and electric bass) and Buddy (vibraphone and piano), were jazz performers. The brothers released a number of albums together as the Montgomery Brothers. Although he was not skilled at reading music, he could learn complex melodies and riffs by ear. Montgomery started learning the six string guitar at the relatively late age of 20 by listening to and learning the recordings of his idol, guitarist Charlie Christian, however he had played a four string tenor guitar since age twelve. He was known for his ability to play Christian's solos note for note and was hired by Lionel Hampton for this ability.

Many fellow jazz guitarists consider Montgomery the greatest influence among modern jazz guitarists. Pat Metheny has praised him greatly, saying "I learned to play listening to Wes Montgomery's Smokin' at the Half Note." In addition, Metheny stated to The New York Times in 2005 that the solo on "If You Could See Me Now," from this album is his favorite of all time. Joe Pass said, "To me, there have been only three real innovators on the guitar—Wes Montgomery, Charlie Christian, and Django Reinhardt," as cited in James Sallis's The Guitar Players and in his Hot Licks instructional video. Kenny Burrell states, "It was an honor that he called me as his second guitarist for a session." In addition, Stevie Ray Vaughan, Eric Johnson, Joe Satriani, Jimi Hendrix, David Becker, Joe Diorio, Steve Lukather and Pat Martino have pointed to him numerous times as a great influence. Lee Ritenour, who recorded the 1992 album Wes Bound named after him, cites him as his most notable influence; he also named his son Wesley.

Following the early work of swing/pre-bop guitarist Charlie Christian and gypsy-jazz guitarist Django Reinhardt, Wes joined Tal Farlow, Johnny Smith, Jimmy Raney, and Barney Kessell to put guitar on the map as a bebop / post-bop instrument. While these men generally curtailed their own output in the 1960s, Montgomery recorded prolifically during this period, lending guitar to the same tunes contemporaries like John Coltrane and Miles Davis were recording. While many jazz players are regarded as virtuosos, Montgomery had a very wide influence on other virtuosos who followed him, and in the respect he earned from his contemporaries. To many, Montgomery's playing defines jazz guitar and the sound that learners try to emulate.

Dave Miele and Dan Bielowsky claim, "Wes Montgomery was certainly one of the most influential and most musical guitarists to ever pick up the instrument... He took the use of octaves and chord melodies to a greater level than any other guitarist, before or since... Montgomery is undoubtedly one of the most important voices in Jazz guitar that has ever lived-or most likely ever will live. A discussion of Jazz guitar is simply not thorough if it does not touch upon Wes Montgomery."

"Listening to [Wes Montgomery's] solos is like teetering at the edge of a brink," composer-conductor Gunther Schuller asserted, as quoted by Jazz & Pop critic Will Smith. "His playing at its peak becomes unbearably exciting, to the point where one feels unable to muster sufficient physical endurance to outlast it." Wes received many awards and accolades: Nominated for two Grammy Awards for Bumpin', 1965; received Grammy Award for Goin' Out of My Head as Best Instrumental Jazz Performance by Large Group or Soloist with Large Group, 1966; nominated for Grammy Awards for "Eleanor Rigby" and "Down Here on the Ground", 1968; nominated for Grammy Award for Willow, Weep for Me, 1969. Wes' second album, The Incredible Jazz Guitar of Wes Montgomery, earned him Down Beat magazine's "New Star" award in 1960. In addition, he won the Down Beat Critic's Poll award for best Jazz guitarist in 1960, '61, '62,'63, '66, and 1967.

Montgomery toured with Lionel Hampton early in his career, however the combined stress of touring and being away from family brought him back home to Indianapolis. To support his family of eight, Montgomery worked in a factory from 7:00 am to 3:00 pm, then performed in local clubs from 9:00 pm to 2:00 am. Cannonball Adderley heard Montgomery in an Indianapolis club and was floored. The next morning, he called record producer Orrin Keepnews, who signed Montgomery to a recording contract with Riverside Records. Adderley later recorded with Montgomery on his Pollwinners album. Montgomery recorded with his brothers and various other group members, including the Wynton Kelly Trio which previously backed up Miles Davis.

John Coltrane asked Montgomery to join his band after a jam session, but Montgomery continued to lead his own band. Boss Guitar seems to refer to his status as a guitar-playing bandleader. He also made contributions to recordings by Jimmy Smith. Jazz purists relish Montgomery's recordings up through 1965, and sometimes complain that he abandoned hard-bop for pop jazz towards the end of his career, although it is arguable that he gained a wider audience for his earlier work with his soft jazz from 1965–1968. During this late period he would occasionally turn out original material alongside jazzy orchestral arrangements of pop songs. In sum, this late period earned him considerable wealth and created a platform for a new audience to hear his earlier recordings.

He didn't have very long to enjoy his commercial success, however; on June 15, 1968, while at home in Indianapolis, Indiana, U.S., he woke one morning, remarked to his wife that he "Didn't feel very well," and minutes later collapsed, dying of a heart attack within minutes. Montgomery's home town of Indianapolis has named a park in his honor. He is the grandfather of actor Anthony Montgomery.
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Tuesday, May 22, 2012

Jimmie Vaughan, Siegel-Schwall, Bernard Allison Anchor 2nd Annual South Bend Blues and Ribs Line-up


South Bend Parks And Recreation Presents:

South Bend Blues & Ribs Festival

Join us for some of the BEST blues, ribs, and good times, all to raise money and awareness for special needs facilities and programming. The South Bend Blues & Ribs Festival begins with gates opening 11:00 a.m. E.D.T., on Saturday, June 23rd, at Coveleski Regional Stadium.

This year's headline act is Jimmie Vaughan & the Tilt-A-Whirl Band, featuring Lou Ann Barton. For more than four decades, Vaughan, the guitar slinging Texan has been earning his living rockin' the blues. Vaughan's love affair with blues and rock'n' roll goes back to his childhood in Dallas. While home from school recuperating from a broken collarbone, he began to play the guitar. He began playing around Texas with a series of bands, most notably the Chessman, who opened for Jimi Hendrix. In 1974, Vaughan played with vocalist and harmonica player Kim Wilson and formed the group The Fabulous Thunderbirds. In 1979, the band released their debut album and a fan base grew from there. The Fabulous thunderbirds reached their peak of popularity with the 1986 release Tuff Enuff. Vaughan stayed with the group another four years after that, and his first move following his exit from the band was to cut an album with his kid brother, Stevie Ray Vaughan. Their album Family Style was a hit upon its release in the fall of 1990. Vaughan launched his solo career in 1994 and released Strange Pleasure produced by Nile Rodgers. Vaughan newest release is titled: Blues, Ballads and Favorites. Other acts include the Siegel-Schwall Band, Bernard Allison, Special Guest: Randy Scott, Blue Lunch (an 8 piece horn-based 50's swing band from Clevelend), and Elwood Splinter's Blues Band opening.

Funds raised from this event will support the design and construction of Miracle Park, a uniquely designed facility for special needs individuals, and special needs programming within the South Bend Parks & Recreation Department.

www.sbpark.org

Ticket Information

Tickets are $20 in advance, $24 day of event

You can purchase tickets at:

The Morris Performing Arts Center Box Office

Hours:

Monday-Friday, 10:00am-6:00pm

Saturday, 10:00am-2:00pm

Phone: 574.235.9190

Toll Free: 800.537.6415

Online: www.MorrisCenter.org

Morris Ticket Outlets:

Hammes Bookstore

Eddy Street Commons

South Bend

O'Brien Center

321 East Walter Street

South Bend

Hours:

Monday-Friday

8:00am-4:30pm

Super Sounds

123 South Main Street

Goshen

Tickets can also be purchased at:

Coveleski Ticket Office

501 West South Street, South Bend


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Thursday, April 26, 2012

The Kinsey Report


The Kinsey Report is a Gary, Indiana based band, established in 1984 by the brothers Donald, Ralph, and Kenneth Kinsey, plus a family friend, Ron Prince. As Big Daddy Kinsey and the Kinsey Report, they effectively backed their father, Big Daddy Kinsey. Lester Davenport played harmonica with the group.

The Kinsey Report's father was instrumental in steering his offspring towards the blues. The older brothers, Donald and Ralph, formed a blues/rock trio called White Lightnin', before the younger children also ended up in the group. Albert King, Bob Marley, Middle Walter and Big Daddy Kinsey have all toured with the group.
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Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Eyesight to the Blind - Manuel Arrington


Manuel Arrington on B.B. King's "Eyesight To The Blind" at Bozley's Sunday Blues Jam in Roselawn, IN
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Wednesday, March 14, 2012

300 Pounds of Heavenly Joy - BigTwist andThe Mellow Fellows


Larry "Big Twist" Nolan was the titular leader of the horn-dominated band, Big Twist and the Mellow Fellows. He got his name from his 6' 4" stature, his weight (often in excess of 300 pounds), and his booming voice. Prior to joining the band in 1970, Twist was living in Carbondale, Illinois and playing drums for a country band. Born in Terre Haute, Indiana in 1937, Twist was a journeyman musician who performed everything from blues to pop in Midwest bar bands. As their stature increased, Big Twist & The Mellow Fellows moved from small, private fraternity parties to concert stages and blues clubs throughout the country.

Throughout the 1970s, Big Twist and the Mellow Fellows built their repertoire on a blend of soul, R&B, blues and rock. They performed at college fraternity parties, beer halls, and clubs throughout the Midwest. In 1978 the band relocated to Chicago and a year later they recorded their self-titled debut album for the Flying Fish label. Their brand of brassy R&B party music made them favorites among young and old alike.
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Thursday, March 8, 2012

Walk On - WT Feaster Band


The WT Feaster Band is a North American blues band from Indianapolis, Indiana, USA. Current members include W.T. Feaster (guitar/vocals), Jake Iseminger (drums/vocal), Austin Shearer (bass), and J. Wesley Smith (piano/organ). Long Overdue, the band’s first full length album, was released in the fall of 2007.
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Friday, March 2, 2012

Stormy Monday - Lefty Bates


Leroy Clyde Bates
Born: May 7 , 1924
Died: March 2, 1991
Leroy was a session bass player for Chess and Vee Jay records in Chicago. He worked for many of the great Blues players of the day.
Biography
Leroy Clyde Bates was a session bass player in Chicago for Vee Jay records and the Chess label. He played the guitar also. Most of the recordings that Lefty played on list the bass player as "unknown". He worked with Howlin' Wolf, Elmore James, Muddy Waters, Pinetop Perkins, Eddie Taylor, and his personal favorite and good friend, Sunny Land Slim. You can hear him on "Big Boss Man" and "Bright Lights, Big City" by Jimmy Reed. He moved to Indianapolis in the 1950's to work as a truck driver as a better means for supporting his family. He continued through out the 1960's to do session work and helped lead the Ink Spots in the early 1970's.
Leroy is buried at Washington Park North Cemetery located on the north side of Indianapolis. Sadly, he has no grave marker. It is our hope that enough funds will be raised to purchase a proper monument befitting to his memory. Lefty was not only a superb bassist and guitarist, but was also a friend and mentor to a countless number of young musicians in the Chicago and Indianapolis areas.
Please note: There are actually 2 (two) Lefty Bates' of the same era. The "other" Lefty Bates is William Bates. He was also a musician and incredibly he also played guitar (not bass) with Jimmy Reed. It is difficult at times when researching Lefty Bates because of the similarities in not only nickname but also style of music and the fact that both men lived in Chicago at the same time. Leroy was all too aware of these strange coincidences but he never seemed bitter that he was not as well recognized as is the "other" Lefty Bates.
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Wednesday, February 29, 2012

Policy Dream Blues - BUMBLE BEE SLIM


Amos Easton (May 7, 1905 – June 8, 1968), better known by the stage name Bumble Bee Slim, was an American Piedmont blues musician.
Easton was born in Brunswick, Georgia, United States. Around 1920 he left home to join the Ringling Brothers' circus before returning to Georgia, marrying briefly, and then heading north on a freight train to Indianapolis where he settled in 1928. There, he met and was influenced by pianist Leroy Carr and guitarist Scrapper Blackwell.

By 1931 he had moved to Chicago, where he first recorded as Bumble Bee Slim for Paramount Records. The following year his song, "B&O Blues", was a hit for Vocalion Records, inspiring a number of other railroad blues and eventually becoming a popular folk song. Over the next five years he recorded over 150 songs for the Decca, Bluebird and Vocalion labels, often accompanied by other musicians such as Big Bill Broonzy, Peetie Wheatstraw, Tampa Red, Memphis Minnie, and Washboard Sam.

In 1937, he returned to Georgia, then relocated to Los Angeles, California, in the early 1940s, apparently hoping to break into motion pictures as a songwriter and comedian. During the 1950s he recorded several albums, but these had little impact. He recorded his last album in 1962 for the Pacific Jazz label.

He continued to perform in clubs around Los Angeles until his death in 1968.
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Saturday, January 21, 2012

Black Cat Bone - Funky Mojo Daddy


Every roots music fan loves being melted by the vibe and energy of a smokin' hot band. When the heat of the music matches that mood, magic is made.

The members of MojoDaddy are all top-shelf musicians who have achieved considerable succes with their respective groups. Throughout their careers, these guys have taken the message of Chicago blues and traveled the world to spread it with artists such as Buddy Guy, Carl Weathersby, the Kinsey Report and the Steepwater Band. The group consists of Kenny Kinsey (bass/vocals), Nick Byrd (guitar/vocals), Jerry Porter (drums/vocals), Jeff Massey (Slide guitar/vocals) and Corey Dennison (guitar/vocals).

Joining forces for this project tot take that message further, they've built a high-energy blues, funk/soul, roots-rock supergroup who thread the spirit of the past into this ten-song disc with creative, passionate playing. Employing a trio of accomplished, fire-breathing guitarists (Nick Byrd, Corey Dennison, Jeff Massey), a rock-solid rhythm section (Kenny Kinsey, Jerry Porter), and four distinct-yet-complimentary vocalists (Byrd, Dennison, Massey, Kinsey), the band fuses their musical tastes into a must-have disc for any hardcore blues-rocker who has an occasional sensitive moment.

Together, they have quickly gained a reputation for being one of Northwest Indiana/Chicagoland area's top blues bands and rhythm sections. All of this has led to them appearing on a regular rotation at some of the areas hottest live music venues and annual summer festivals.

These musician's pride themselves on playing with heart and soul, creating an unstoppable energy. Their intense delivery of the music will have you up and dancing, while never letting you forget where our musical debt is owed.
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Bad Situation - Big Daddy Kinsey & the Kinsey Report


The Kinsey Report is a Gary, Indiana based band, established in 1984 by the brothers Donald, Ralph, and Kenneth Kinsey, plus a family friend, Ron Prince. As Big Daddy Kinsey and the Kinsey Report, they effectively backed their father, Big Daddy Kinsey. Lester Davenport played harmonica with the group.

The Kinsey Report's father was instrumental in steering his offspring towards the blues. The older brothers, Donald and Ralph, formed a blues/rock trio called White Lightnin', before the younger children also ended up in the group.[1] Albert King, Bob Marley, Middle Walter and Big Daddy Kinsey have all toured with the group
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Thursday, May 19, 2011

Oreo Cookie Blues - Lonnie mack with SRV


If you've never seen Stevie Ray play acoustic slide and you don't know Lonnie Mack this will be a double treat. I know I really enjoy it.

Lonnie Mack (born Lonnie McIntosh, 18 July 1941, Dearborn County, Indiana) is an American rock and blues guitarist/vocalist.

In 1963 and early 1964, he recorded a succession of full-length electric guitar instrumentals which combined blues stylism with fast-picking techniques and a rock 'n' roll beat. The best-known of these are "Memphis", "Wham!", "Chicken Pickin'" and "Suzie-Q". These instrumentals established the standard of virtuosity for a generation of rock guitarists and formed the leading edge of the "blues-rock" guitar genre. Reportedly, the tremolo arm commonly found on electric guitars became known as the "whammy bar", following Mack's singularly aggressive use of the device in 1963's "Wham!".


In 1979, music historian Richard T. Pinnell, Ph. D., called 1963's "Memphis" a "milestone of early rock guitar". In 1980, the editors of Guitar World magazine ranked "Memphis" first among rock's top five "landmark" guitar recordings.

Mack is also renowned for his early "blue-eyed soul" ballads. Crediting both Mack's R&B vocals and his guitar solos, music critic Jimmy Guterman ranked Mack's first album, 1963's The Wham of that Memphis Man!, No. 16 in his book The 100 Best Rock 'n' Roll Records of All Time.

Mack released several singles in the '50s and '60s, as well as thirteen original albums spanning a variety of genres between 1963 and 1990. He enjoyed his greatest recognition as a blues-rock performer, with productive periods during the '60s and the latter half of the '80s. However, an aversion to notoriety led him to switch musical genres and sporadically withdraw from the public eye for years at a time. Despite a modest all-career recording output as a rock artist, he is widely regarded today as "one of the great rock guitarists of all-time", as well as an innovative and pivotal figure in expanding the role of the electric guitar in rock.

Beyond his career as a solo artist, Mack recorded with The Doors, Stevie Ray Vaughan, James Brown, Freddie King, Joe Simon, Ronnie Hawkins, Albert Collins, Roy Buchanan, Dobie Gray and the sons of blues legend Arthur "Big Boy" Crudup, among others.
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Saturday, April 23, 2011

Bad Things - Jace Everett


Ok. Here we go blurring the lines again. Is it the blues? Sure as hell ain't country...just watched Porter Wagoner show last night...that's country! Ok lets look for the clues... no cowboy hats... got a steel guitar... plays a Gibson J200... but he has a girl bass player and the guitar player plays an SG through a Vox amp. This ain't your daddy's country... this ain't your sisters country... it just good music... I think it might be the blues!
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