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I started a quest to find terrific blues music and incredible musicianship when I was just a little kid. I also have a tremendous appreciation of fine musical instruments and equipment. One of my greatest joys all of my life was sharing my finds with my friends. I'm now publishing my journey. I hope that you come along!


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Showing posts with label Cigar Box Guitars. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Cigar Box Guitars. Show all posts

Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Jeff Beck Plays Screaming Slide on an Oil Can Guitar

The guys at Bohemian Guitars just posted this live concert video of Jeff Beck playing one of their oil can guitars. Is there anything Beck can't play? (-----ah....no!) BTW, Beck's very first instrument was a cigar box guitar he built as a child. Here's a close-up shot of Beck and his Bohemian oil can guitar. A certain cigar box guitarist stands beside him.

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Sunday, December 4, 2011

Black Cat Bone - HAT FITZ & CARA ROBINSON


"What a combination ! .. One of Australia’s festival favorites and perennial showstopper Hat Fitz is now joined on stage by Northern Ireland’s critically acclaimed vocalist extraordinaire and multi instrumentalist Cara Robinson on drums, washboard, flute and tin whistle. .. Recent performances overseas saw the duo play a total of 81 shows including some of the world’s most prestigious festivals across England, Ireland, France and Scotland to packed houses and rave reviews. .. The blending of pre war hill country and delta blues with traditional celtic and early Australian folk has produced a truly unique musical style that’s seen audiences world wide drift off into the early morning, often drenched with sweat and always covered in smiles. .. Sometimes referred to as “Queensland blooze with a twist” you’ll soon appreciate what all the fuss is about. .. It’s raw, raucous and relevant. .. MUSIC IN A JUGLUAR VEIN !"
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Tuesday, August 2, 2011

Pennsylvania Cigar Box Guitar Festival August 27, 2011

#1 resource for Cigar Box Guitars. Free Plans, & the Homemade Music Movement
Shane Speal
Shane Speal has invited you to the event 'The Pennsylvania Cigar Box Guitar Festival • August 27, 2011' on Cigar Box Nation!
14 Bands, 2 Stages, Demonstrations, Jams and food. This is the world's largest cigar box guitar festival ever organized.

The Pennsylvania Cigar Box Guitar Festival • August 27, 2011 Time: August 27, 2011 at 10am to August 28, 2011 at 10am
Location: YORKFEST ARTS FESTIVAL DOWNTOWN YORK CITY
Organized By: the York Emporium

Event Description:
It's blues • It's rock • It's primal • It's free The Pennsylvania Cigar Box Guitar Festival celebrates this traditional, home-made instrument with two stages and live music in downtown York. Both nationally-touring bands and local amateur musicians perform. Think Delta Blues meets local garage band. Food and merchandise vendors combine to make this a family-friendly fun event.


See more details and RSVP on Cigar Box Nation:
http://www.cigarboxnation.com/events/event/show?id=2592684%3AEvent%3A450069&xgi=0mCQ8JnTqkibOM&xg_source=msg_invite_event
About Cigar Box Nation

Saturday, June 11, 2011

Teck Talk - Beginning 3 string (Cigar Box) Guitar Playing


Ok. You built your first cigar box guitar...now what do you do with it. Here's a nice little video for starters.

Enjoy

Thursday, June 2, 2011

Tech Talk - Building A Cigar Box Guitar Part 6


The cigar box guitar is a primitive chordophone whose resonator is a discarded cigar box. Because the instrument is homemade, there is no standard for dimensions, string types or construction techniques. Many early cigar box guitars consisted of only one or two strings that were attached to the ends of a broomstick that was inserted into the cigar box. Other cigar box guitars were more complex, with the builder attempting to simulate a traditional string instrument such as a guitar, banjo, or fiddle.

Tuesday, May 31, 2011

Tech Talk - Building A Cigar Box Guitar Part 5


Installation 5 of building your own cigar box guitar.

Enjoy!

7th Annual Alabama Cigar Box Guitar Festival - June 3rd and 4th, 2011 – Huntsville, Alabama


The 7th Annual Cigar Box Guitar Festival will take place in the Flying Monkey Arts Center located at Lowe Mill. The address is 2211 Seminole Drive Southwest Huntsville, AL 35805.

Here is a schedule of events during the festival:

6/3 – Friday – Hymn for Her, Admission FREE Concerts on the Dock (6pm – 9pm)

6/4 – Saturday – Artist Market 2nd floor, handcrafted instruments and more… (Noon – 4pm)

Demonstrations: How to Build a Cigar Box Guitar with John Nickel (1pm & 3pm)
1st floor studios : Nickel Cigar Box Guitar

Workshops:
12:30 & 2pm – “Build a One- String CBG with Steve Webb
1st floor classroom – $30. materials & tools provided questions or registration: backpocketcrafts@yahoo.com

1:30 & 2:30pm – “Learn to Play a Cigar Box Guitar” with Pat Nickel
1st floor lounge near Nickel’s CBG Studio

Jam Sessions: 1st floor lounge area / 2nd floor connector / on the dock
Special Guest, Max Shores, documentary filmmaker
“Songs Inside the Box” and “Hill Country Troubadour”
2nd floor Film Co-op / Don Tingle studio near theater

Flymo Theater Extravaganza – Saturday – 4th (4pm – 12am)
4pm – “Hill Country Troubadour” film screening, Admission $5
“Live” Cigar Box Guitar Music ’till midnight, Admission $10
6pm – Pat Nickel
7pm – Seven Hills Stomp
8pm – Microwave Dave
9pm – John Lowe
10pm – Earl Williams
11pm – Nadaband

Bill Jehle’s Cigar Box Guitar Museum will be on display throughout the festival.

Sunday, May 29, 2011

Building A Cigar Box Guitar Part 4


A quick update on the project... I carved a butterfly onto the body. I probably shouldn't be so concerned with aesthetics on cbg #1 but as an artist I can help it! I also used a program to make a template for the fret scales. It's called WFRET. Find it here: http://europa.spaceports.com/~fishbake/soft/wfret.zip


Wednesday, May 25, 2011

Monday, May 23, 2011

Saturday, May 21, 2011

Building a Cigar Box Guitar

The cigar box guitar is a primitive chordophone whose resonator is a discarded cigar box. Because the instrument is homemade, there is no standard for dimensions, string types or construction techniques. Many early cigar box guitars consisted of only one or two strings that were attached to the ends of a broomstick that was inserted into the cigar box. Other cigar box guitars were more complex, with the builder attempting to simulate a traditional string instrument such as a guitar, banjo, or fiddle.




Cigars were packed in boxes, crates, and barrels as early as 1800, but the small sized boxes that we are familiar with today did not exist prior to around 1840.[1] Until then, cigars were shipped in larger crates containing 100 or more per case. After 1840, cigar manufacturers started using smaller, more portable boxes with 20-50 cigars per box.

Trace evidence of cigar box instruments exist from 1840 to the 1860s. The earliest illustrated proof of a cigar box instrument known is an etching copyrighted in 1876 of two Civil War Soldiers at a campsite with one playing a cigar box fiddle. The etching was created by illustrator and artist Edwin Forbes who, under the banner of Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, worked for the Union Army. The etching was included in Forbes work Life Stories of the Great Army. In the etching, the cigar box fiddle clearly shows the brand ‘Figaro’ on the cigar box.

In addition to the etching, plans for a cigar box banjo were published by Daniel Carter Beard, co-founder of the Boy Scouts of America, in 1884 as part of 'Christmas Eve With Uncle Enos.' The plans, eventually retitled ‘How to Build an Uncle Enos Banjo’ as part of Beard's American Boy’s Handy Book in the 1890 release as supplementary material in the rear of the book. These plans omitted the story but still showed a step-by-step description for a playable 5-string fretless banjo made from a cigar box.



It would seem that the earliest cigar box instruments would be extremely crude and primitive; however, this is not always the case. The National Cigar Box Guitar Museum, according to One Man's Trash: A History of the Cigar Box Guitar[3], has acquired two cigar box fiddles built in 1886 and 1889 that seem very playable and well built. The 1886 fiddle was made for an 8 year old boy and is certainly playable, but the 1889 fiddle has a well carved neck and slotted violin headstock. The latter instrument was made for serious playing.

The cigar box guitars and fiddles were also important in the rise of jug bands and blues. As most of these performers were black Americans living in poverty, many could not afford a "real" instrument. Using these, along with the washtub bass (similar to the cigar box guitar), jugs, washboards, and harmonica, black musicians performed blues during socializations.



The Great Depression of the 1930s saw a resurgence of homemade musical instruments. Times were hard in the American south and for entertainment sitting on the front porch singing away their blues was a popular pastime. Musical instruments were beyond the means of everybody, but an old cigar box, a piece of broom handle and a couple wires from the screen door and a guitar was born.

A modern revival of these instruments (also known as the Cigar Box Guitar Revolution) has been gathering momentum with an increase in cigar box guitar builders and performers. A loose-knit tour of underground musicians tour the East Coast (US) each summer under the banner "Masters of the Cigar Box Guitar Tour." These musicians include Doctor Oakroot, Johnny Lowebow, Tomi-O and many others. Also, there is a growing number of primitive luthiers adding cigar box guitars to their items for sale.[citation needed] Of the more noteworthy cigar box guitar makers is Shane Speal, the so-called "King of the Cigar Box Guitar."

Modern revival is sometimes due to interest in jugband and the DIY culture, as a cigar box is relatively inexpensive when considering other factors, such as strings and construction time. Many modern cigar box guitar can thus be seen as a type of practice in lutherie, and implement numerous personal touches, such as the addition of pick up and resonator cones into it.

The modern revival of cigar box guitars is documented in the 2008 film, "Songs Inside The Box" which was shot primarily at an annual Huntsville, Alabama event called the Cigar Box Guitar Extravaganza

This is the first in a series of how to build a cigar box guitar.

Friday, May 13, 2011

Tuesday, May 3, 2011

You Gotta Move


Cigars were packed in boxes, crates, and barrels as early as 1800, but the small sized boxes that we are familiar with today did not exist prior to around 1840.[1] Until then, cigars were shipped in larger crates containing 100 or more per case. After 1840, cigar manufacturers started using smaller, more portable boxes with 20-50 cigars per box.

Trace evidence of cigar box instruments exist from 1840 to the 1860s. The earliest illustrated proof of a cigar box instrument known is an etching copyrighted in 1876 of two Civil War Soldiers at a campsite with one playing a cigar box fiddle. The etching was created by illustrator and artist Edwin Forbes who, under the banner of Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, worked for the Union Army. The etching was included in Forbes work Life Stories of the Great Army. In the etching, the cigar box fiddle clearly shows the brand ‘Figaro’ on the cigar box.

In addition to the etching, plans for a cigar box banjo were published by Daniel Carter Beard, co-founder of the Boy Scouts of America, in 1884 as part of 'Christmas Eve With Uncle Enos.' The plans, eventually retitled ‘How to Build an Uncle Enos Banjo’ as part of Beard's American Boy’s Handy Book in the 1890 release as supplementary material in the rear of the book.[2] These plans omitted the story but still showed a step-by-step description for a playable 5-string fretless banjo made from a cigar box.

It would seem that the earliest cigar box instruments would be extremely crude and primitive; however, this is not always the case. The National Cigar Box Guitar Museum, according to One Man's Trash: A History of the Cigar Box Guitar[3], has acquired two cigar box fiddles built in 1886 and 1889 that seem very playable and well built. The 1886 fiddle was made for an 8 year old boy and is certainly playable, but the 1889 fiddle has a well carved neck and slotted violin headstock. The latter instrument was made for serious playing.

The cigar box guitars and fiddles were also important in the rise of jug bands and blues. As most of these performers were black Americans living in poverty, many could not afford a "real" instrument. Using these, along with the washtub bass (similar to the cigar box guitar), jugs, washboards, and harmonica, black musicians performed blues during socializations.

The Great Depression of the 1930s saw a resurgence of homemade musical instruments. Times were hard in the American south and for entertainment sitting on the front porch singing away their blues was a popular pastime. Musical instruments were beyond the means of everybody, but an old cigar box, a piece of broom handle and a couple wires from the screen door and a guitar was born.