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I started a quest to find terrific blues music and incredible musicianship when I was just a little kid. I also have a tremendous appreciation of fine musical instruments and equipment. One of my greatest joys all of my life was sharing my finds with my friends. I'm now publishing my journey. I hope that you come along!

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Monday, July 21, 2014

Presenting Jeremy Baum - The EEL!

Jeremy Baum

    Jeremy Baum is a musician's musician.  A world-class keyboard maestro with a star-studded playing history...with great ears and a soulful delivery, keeping him busy in recording studios, concert halls, and nightspots of every stripe….
"The behaviour of eels in fresh water extends the air of
mystery surrounding them. They move freely into muddy, silty
bottoms of lakes, lying buried in the daylight hours in summer...
    He is the first-call player of choice for artists who perform blues, jazz, funk, and all the styles that fill the cracks in between. Jeremy applies his tasty style to many types of music...
""Eels are voracious carnivores, feeding mainly at
night and consuming a wide variety of fishes and invertebrate
    Baum is a monstrous talent, coaxing tones and textures from his instrument as he moves freely from subtle comping to stunning solos and back in the blink of an eye...
"The eels are sea monsters; they are comprised of the giant eel and electric eel. The kraken is sometimes categorised with them as well. They are referred to as a group by virtue of the drowning attack they share."
    Jeremy Baum plays the Hammond Organ and piano and leads his own band, which is rooted in the blues and funky soul-jazz sounds of the late 60s (think Booker T and the MG’s, the Meters, Jimmy Smith!)  His style is also informed by the current masters of the groove from the jam-band scene (Medeski, Martin & Wood, Soulive, Derek Trucks Band, Marco Benevento.)

    While still in college, Jeremy joined Murali Coryell's band, and soon began leading his own organ trio. In 2002 Jeremy released his first album, Lost River Jams, on Flying Yak Records.  JB’s Band was also featured on Boogaloo to McDuff, a tribute to Jack McDuff, available on Scufflin’ Records. Jeremy has been leading his band at festivals and clubs in the New York and New England region ever since.

    Jeremy has been a successful sideman, working with Shemekia Copeland (6 years in her band), Levon Helm, soul-jazz legend Melvin Sparks, Sue Foley, Joe Louis Walker, Debbie Davies, Chris O’Leary, John Hammond Jr., and many more.  He has played in nearly every state in the USA, in over 25 countries in North America, Europe and Asia, at countless music festivals, at Carnegie Hall, and many television appearances including Late Night with David Letterman. The man has paid some dues!

     Back in the studio for his sophomore release, The Eel, on Flying Yak Records, Jeremy Baum knocks it out of the park with 10 Hammond organ and piano driven arrangements.  It's an album of funky, bluesy new compositions as well as original arrangements of songs by Beck, Prince, James Brown and more.  Recorded by the amazing Dave Gross at Fat Rabbit Studios, this album features many of the best and brightest musicians from Jeremy's twin musical homes of New York City and the Hudson Valley/Woodstock NY area. Special guests include, among others, Jay Collins, Eric Kalb, Scott Sharrard, guitar prodigy Myles Mancuso, Chris Vitarello, and VizzTone artists Dennis Gruenling, Michael Bram, and Chris O’Leary.

Jeremy Baum
Needless to say, this album covers a lot of ground stylistically.
For those of you looking for BLUES CONTENT, may I particularly suggest:

        7. PACIFIC DRIVE


1. THE NEW POLLUTION - Cover of Beck's groovy hit! Souljazz for the new
Jeremy Baum - Accordion, Hammond B3 Organ, Wurlitzer 200A Electric Piano
Chris Vitarello - Guitar
Eric Kalb - Drums
Jay Collins - Tenor Sax, Flute
Juma Sultan - Congas

2. FUNKY MONKEY - An original B3 party jam.
Jeremy Baum - Hammond B3 Organ
Myles Mancuso - Guitar
Chris Reddan - Drums
Juma Sultan - Congas
Dave Gross - Tambourine

3. THREE MORE BOTTLES - New Orleans flavor, piano and harmonica driven, with
lyrics and vocals by Blues Blast Award winner Chris O'Leary.
Jeremy Baum - Piano
Chris Vitarello - Guitar
Michael Bram - Drums
Matt Raymond - Acoustic Bass
Chris O'Leary- Vocals, Harmonica

4. CHARLIE BAUM - Jeremy's nod to Vince Guaraldi and the Peanuts, as well as
Ramsey Lewis' "The In Crowd."
Jeremy Baum - Piano
Matt Raymond - Acoustic Bass
Michael Bram - Drums
Eddie Torres - Congas

5. DANCE WITH ME - A tribute to Jeremy's friend Larry Hoppen, this is a
pretty instrumental arrangement of the Orleans classic.
Jeremy Baum - Hammond B3 Organ, Wurlitzer 200A Electric Piano
Chris Vitarello - Acoustic Guitar, Electric Guitar
Eric Kalb - Drums
Dennis Greunling - Harmonica

6. BORRACHO - Boogaloo cover of obscure 70's West Coast band Dyna-Might.
Jeremy Baum - Hammond B3 Organ
Myles Mancuso - Electric Guitar
Anthony Candullo - Electric Bass
Chris Reddan - Drums
Eddie Torres - Congas
Jay Collins - Tenor Sax
Phil DeMier - Trumpet
Dean Jones - Trombone

7. PACIFIC DRIVE - Guitar driven instrumental featuring 17 year old prodigy Myles Mancuso. If you like The Crusaders / Larry Carlton...
Jeremy Baum - Hammond B3 Organ, Wurlitzer 200A EP
Myles Mancuso - Electric Guitar
Tony Tino - Electric Bass
Eric Kalb - Drums
Juma Sultan - Congas

8. AIN'T IT FUNKY NOW - B3 driven guitar heavy funk jam ala James Brown.
Jeremy Baum - Hammond B3 Organ
Chris Vitarello - Guitar (Left Speaker)
Scott Sharrard - Guitar (Right Speaker)
Eric Kalb - Drums
Juma Sultan - Congas, Vocal

9. PURPLE RAIN - Instrumental guitar driven version of the Prince classic -
with a Bruce Hornsby inspired piano solo.
Jeremy Baum - Hammond B3 Organ, Piano
Chris Vitarello - Electric Guitar
Eric Kalb - Drums
Juma Sultan - Congas

10. THE EEL - B3 driven far out funky instrumental with elements of Led
Zeppelin, The Meters and Tower of Power!!!
Jeremy Baum - Hammond B3 Organ, MiniKorg-700, Korg R3
Myles Mancuso - Electric Guitar
Chris Reddan - Drums
Juma Sultan - Congas



CD or Digital Music from

Digital Music from

THE EEL features a host of amazing musicians,
many of whom you've probably heard before...

Chris Vitarello: Guitar (Jimmy McGriff, Bruce Katz, Chris O'Leary Band)
Eric Kalb: Drums (Deep Banana Blackout, John Scofield, Charlie Hunter)
Jay Collins: Tenor Sax, Flute (Greg Allman Band, Levon Helm)
Juma Sultan: Congas (Jimi Hendrix, Archie Shepp)
Michael Bram: Drums (Jason Mraz, Watermelon Slim, VizzTone Artist)
Chris O'Leary: Vocals, Harmonica (Levon Helm, VizzTone Artist)
Dennis Greunling: Harmonica (VizzTone Artist, Doug Deming & the Jewel Tones)
Chris Reddan: Drums (Popa Chubby)
Tony Tino: Electric Bass (Gavin Degraw, Clay Aiken)
Scott Sharrard: Guitar (Gregg Allman Band, The Chesterfields)
Myles Mancuso: Guitar (Myles Mancuso Band) - fast-rising guitar prodigy
Matt Raymond: Bass (Chris O'Leary Band, Mikey Junior)
Dean Jones: Trombone (Soñando, Grammy-winning producer)
Phil DeMier: Trumpet (Soñando)
Eddie Torres: Percussion (Mark Egan, Joel Rosenblatt)

And chances are, you've probably heard Jeremy Baum before —
mabye even on some of your favorite records!

Bill PERRY / Love Scars

SLAM ALLEN / Things Sho Done Changed
SUE FOLEY / Ten Days In November
BILL PERRY / Greycourt Lightining
DEBBIE DAVIES / Round Every Corner
LITTLE MELVIN UNDERWOOD / Dealin' With The Feelin'

DEBBIE DAVIES with DOUBLE TROUBLE / Tales From The Austin Motel

JIM WEIDER (guitarist for The Band) / Remedy

MELVIN SPARKS (Soul-jazz legend) / It Is What It Is

SHEMEKIA COPELAND / On Stage at World Cafe Live (DVD)

DEBBIE DAVIES / After The Fall
CHRIS O'LEARY BAND / Waiting for the Phone to Ring
MICHAEL BRAM / Suitcase in the Hall
PETEY HOP / The Levee

BRAD VICKERS and the VESTAPOLITANS / Great Day In The Morning

MIKEY JUNIOR / Traveling South

some early press...

Poughkeepsie Journal
John Barry   June 19, 2014

New CD from Jeremy Baum offers soul, jazz and the blues

    One Hammond B3 player I've been watching for years is Jeremy Baum of New Windsor, whose touch on the keyboard can be tender or torrential, quiet or quick.
    Baum, a graduate of the State University of New York at New Paltz who has performed often in Dutchess County, doesn't just play his instrument, he draws sound from it. He teases sound from the organ, coaxes it out, and at the right moment, he propels it forward, to a legion of faithful followers who enjoy his fusion of soul, jazz and the blues.
    And just as they're chewing on it all, Baum lobs another one their way.
    He simultaneously negotiates and executes his way up and down that keyboard, while keeping the crowd abreast of any and all musical equations he happens to piece together, with the insight of a college professor and the sheer joy of a kid in a candy shop.
    All of this brings me to Baum's new CD, "The Eel," a dissection of musical genres stamped with the personality of a musician who knows when to take a gallop to a stampede, when to batten down the hatches and when to throw caution to the wind.
    This CD has a lot of great tunes on it. But if it only had "Pacific Drive" on it, just one song, it would be worth getting your hands on. Written by Baum, this bouncy, optimistic song meanders just enough to pique your curiosity, but returns repeatedly to the grit and grime of a good blues tune, thanks in large part to the unrelenting guitar licks of Myles Mancuso, who is originally from LaGrange.
    I found myself playing this song over and over, tapping my feet and rocking back and forth in my chair. With these tunes, prepare to move — and be moved.

Steven M. Alper

    I was immediately grabbed by the guy at the Hammond. (Jeremy's) playing was by turns intense and understated, showing such mastery of the instrument. Brilliant, well-shaped solos, slipping back and forth over that line between inside and outside, never quite treading beyond the style (but hinting at the possibility). It was the subtle, effervescent accompanying that really surprised, the ever-changing tone and texture, slapping rhythm juxtaposed with sustain. This guy knows the Hammond from the inside out, digging out the sounds of the physical tone wheels from the new electronic box.

The Working Musician (.com)
Roger-Z   March 01, 2014

    Jeremy Baum puts the fun back into keyboard-based, instrumental garage-rock. Think back to "99 Tears" by Question Mark and The Mysterians or "Wooly Bully" and "Little Red Riding Hood" by Sam the Sham and The Pharaohs. The Sixties managed to reflect the turmoil as well as the joy in American society. We still share the distress -- but Jeremy Baum puts smiles back on our faces. Our star here finds himself surrounded by some of New York's finest -- guitar (Chris Vitarello, Myles Mancuso, Scott Sharrard), vocals (Chris O'Leary), drums (Eric Kalb, Chris Reddan, Michael Bram), bass (Matt Raymond, Tony Tino, Anthony Candullo), sax (Jay Collins), percussion (Dave Gross, Juma Sultan, Eddie Torres), harmonica (Dennis Gruenling), trumpet (Phil DeMier), trombone (Dean Jones). Jeremy Baum produced the album and guitar phenonomen Dave Gross captured it at Fat Rabbit Studios in Montclair, New Jersey.
    The jubilant music romps wild. It kicks off with "The New Pollution," a one chord stomp with a bass line similar to The Beatles' "Tax Man". Baum pegs the perfect Hammond B3 tone to weave in with Vitarello's so tasteful guitar. "Funky Monkey" gets the blues down on the "good foot." Baum turns his organ up and lets it all hang out! The turnaround provides the hook. "Three More Bottles" features Chris O'Leary apologizing for his bad behavior. Woman gone -- but plenty of booze and harp playing! Don't know who "Charlie Baum" is, but this composition reeks of Ramsey Lewis!
    Lots of variety on this album. "Borracho" shows off horn-driven Latin roots. Myles Mancuso dominates on "Pacific Drive" with the tastiest R&B guitar. James Brown's "Ain't It Funky Now" launches a monumental blowing session between Chris Vitarello, Scott Sharrard, and Baum. The anthematic "Purple Rain" proves a most inspired cover. Once again, Baum and Vitarello bob and weave like brothers from a different mother! The title cut, "The Eel," evokes Soulive and allows Mancuso and the group to show off monster tempo changes and chops!
    Jeremy Baum manages to bring "peace, love, and happiness" back to instrumental music. He mainlines his inner joy. Job exceedingly well done!

Almanac Weekly
John Burdick   November 22, 2013

    Keyboardist Jeremy Baum has been a highly visible and in-demand regional-and-beyond sideman for a long time now, flexing his fine touch, great ears and multigenre fluencies in some pretty top-shelf blues, Latin and jazz settings. Like so many courted and coveted sidemen, Baum leads his own band as well, when he can, finding time about once a decade to record his own material with his sidemen of choice. 2003’s Lost River Jams was a funky, spacious set, foregrounding Baum’s tasteful Hammond and piano-playing. Owing more to the brainy, Monkish lines of a Larry Golding than to the non-stop blowing of Joey DeFrancesco, Baum keeps things fresh with jazz, Latin and gospel colors sprinkled throughout this fine trio-plus-friends blues session.
    Baum has reconvened a trio – this time with guitarist Chris Vitarello and drummer Chris Reddan – for the soon-to-be released CD The Eel. It is this trio that Baum brings to the Liberty Lounge in Rhinebeck on Saturday, November 23 at 9:30 p.m. The Eel isn’t out yet, but the band will no doubt be offering a sneak peak of what to expect.

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